Medicaid

Medicaid managed care enrollment update – Q4 2022

This week, our In Focus section reviews recent Medicaid enrollment trends in capitated, risk-based managed care in 32 states.[1] Many state Medicaid agencies post monthly enrollment figures by health plan for their Medicaid managed care population to their websites. This data allows for the timeliest analysis of enrollment trends across states and managed care organizations. All 32 states highlighted in this review have released monthly Medicaid managed care enrollment data into the fourth quarter (Q4) of 2022. This report reflects the most recent data posted. HMA will continue tracking enrollment throughout the eligibility redetermination period. HMA has made the following observations related to the enrollment data shown on Table 1 (below):

  • The 32 states in this report account for an estimated 71 million Medicaid managed care enrollees as of December 2022. Based on HMA estimates of MCO enrollment in states not covered in this report, we believe that nationwide Medicaid MCO enrollment was likely about 75 million in December 2022. As such, the enrollment data across these 32 states represents approximately 95 percent of all Medicaid MCO enrollment.
  • Across the 32 states tracked in this report, Medicaid managed care enrollment is up 7.5 percent year-over-year as of December 2022.
  • All states, besides Mississippi, saw increases in enrollment in December 2022, compared to the previous year, due to the gains from the COVID-19 pandemic. Mississippi Medicaid managed care enrollment fell because the state shifted members to FFS during the public health emergency.
  • Twenty-three of the 32 states – Arizona, California, District of Columbia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Washington, and West Virginia – expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act and have seen increased Medicaid managed care enrollment since expansion.
  • The 23 expansion states listed above have seen net Medicaid managed care enrollment increase by 3.5 million members, or 7.2 percent, in the past year, to 52.2 million members at the end of 2022.
  • The nine states that have not yet expanded Medicaid as of December 2022 – Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin – have seen Medicaid managed care enrollment increase 8.3 percent to 19 million members at the end of 2022.

Table 1 – Monthly MCO Enrollment by State – July 2022 through December 2022

 Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Arizona2,069,0482,079,3602,095,1012,106,8002,116,4442,127,666
+/- m/m8,52710,31215,74111,6999,64411,222
% y/y7.6%0.0%7.5%7.4%7.2%7.1%
California12,929,50013,013,32413,073,42713,132,61613,231,99313,204,398
+/- m/m215,50683,82460,10359,18999,377(27,595)
% y/y9.8%9.9%9.9%9.9%10.2%9.5%
D.C.246,957247,704248,577249,617250,676 
+/- m/m3,2237478731,0401,059N/A
% y/y6.7%6.7%6.5%6.5%6.4%
Florida4,385,9654,432,2334,465,6704,502,2974,537,1214,581,266
+/- m/m41,44146,26833,43736,62734,82444,145
% y/y10.9%10.9%10.7%10.7%10.7%11.0%
Georgia1,975,2771,988,727 2,016,4622,027,2752,035,673
+/- m/m13,11713,450N/AN/A10,8138,398
% y/y9.8%9.5%9.0%8.7%8.3%
Illinois2,890,3322,884,0292,900,2322,929,5842,965,0073,000,717
+/- m/m(8,672)(6,303)16,20329,35235,42335,710
% y/y5.1%4.5%4.1%4.4%5.1%5.5%
Indiana1,742,7621,761,6921,769,4001,781,4641,797,4511,813,044
+/- m/m6,90618,9307,70812,06415,98715,593
% y/y11.6%11.3%11.0%10.5%10.2%10.3%
Iowa795,534799,748807,296 812,481814,490
+/- m/m2,6424,2147,548N/AN/A2,009
% y/y5.9%5.8%6.4%6.0%6.1%
Kansas489,309490,911492,640497,257499,143500,814
+/- m/m2,6911,6021,7294,6171,8861,671
% y/yN/AN/AN/AN/A8.3%6.3%
Kentucky1,494,0681,487,3871,509,2741,518,9061,528,4841,534,657
+/- m/m6,069(6,681)21,8879,6329,5786,173
% y/y5.5%5.3%5.6%5.8%6.7%6.1%
Louisiana1,821,6441,828,0151,833,4571,841,6931,858,0921,860,170
+/- m/m7,2136,3715,4428,23616,3992,078
% y/y4.6%4.5%4.4%4.7%5.2%5.8%
Maryland1,496,6771,502,2711,508,4691,514,3811,521,1711,529,308
+/- m/m8,2055,5946,1985,9126,7908,137
% y/y6.5%6.2%6.1%5.8%5.8%5.7%
Michigan2,280,2432,294,4322,299,9132,309,9132,319,9512,324,046
+/- m/m2,92314,1895,48110,00010,0384,095
% y/y3.8%3.6%3.5%3.7%4.5%4.3%
Minnesota1,261,1121,262,0731,278,9541,286,8901,293,8581,299,194
+/- m/m1,89396116,8817,9366,9685,336
% y/y7.3%6.7%7.4%7.5%7.5%7.5%
Mississippi367,137363,387364,612355,694367,902396,880
+/- m/m(452)(3,750)1,225(8,918)12,20828,978
% y/y-22.7%-19.9%-17.4%-17.3%-12.5%-3.9%
Missouri1,038,2391,065,2171,099,7071,118,3731,136,5891,157,005
+/- m/m26,52026,97834,49018,66618,21620,416
% y/y27.0%29.1%32.6%31.7%31.8%29.0%
Nebraska363,328366,202369,770372,613374,857378,237
+/- m/m2,7402,8743,5682,8432,2443,380
% y/y12.4%11.9%11.7%11.2%10.8%10.6%
Nevada687,362689,139697,752675,465685,736692,890
+/- m/m9,4641,7778,613(22,287)10,2717,154
% y/y9.3%9.0%9.3%4.2%5.2%5.7%
New Jersey2,100,9472,113,9302,125,1812,130,8682,144,5142,158,966
+/- m/m10,89712,98311,2515,68713,64614,452
% y/y7.4%7.4%7.2%7.0%7.1%7.0%
New Mexico809,991811,732812,995813,630814,466815,798
+/- m/m2,4911,7411,2636358361,332
% y/y4.2%3.7%3.4%3.0%2.6%2.3%
New York5,855,6155,853,1085,878,5195,906,2645,929,2885,961,782
+/- m/m39,970(2,507)25,41127,74523,02432,494
% y/y4.5%4.3%4.2%4.3%4.5%4.6%
North Carolina1,738,5451,746,9481,757,5031,768,9741,778,1991,837,423
+/- m/m9,0478,40310,55511,4719,22559,224
% y/y8.0%6.8%6.7%6.6%6.6%9.5%
Ohio2,964,7312,963,6162,960,9222,958,6662,961,9832,973,763
+/- m/m(1,340)(1,115)(2,694)(2,256)3,31711,780
% y/y3.4%2.6%1.9%1.4%1.0%0.9%
Oregon1,193,3581,202,1981,206,5201,211,0991,221,4351,228,054
+/- m/m3,9208,8404,3224,57910,3366,619
% y/y8.3%8.4%7.7%7.6%7.4%7.2%
Pennsylvania2,895,8372,909,9852,920,5842,937,0492,950,6132,966,207
+/- m/m13,97314,14810,59916,46513,56415,594
% y/y7.4%7.3%6.9%6.8%6.6%6.5%
South Carolina1,055,7851,063,4451,069,5691,078,0941,084,5291,089,577
+/- m/m5,2267,6606,1248,5256,4355,048
% y/y7.6%7.5%7.4%7.9%7.6%7.5%
Tennessee1,692,3951,704,3981,710,1251,718,5391,726,6031,734,108
+/- m/m6,73712,0035,7278,4148,0647,505
% y/y6.0%6.1%6.1%6.0%5.9%5.8%
Texas 5,466,045  5,653,169 
+/- m/mN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
% y/y8.6%10.6%
Virginia1,572,9231,582,9731,589,7221,598,8751,608,8401,619,311
+/- m/m11,82910,0506,7499,1539,96510,471
% y/y11.3%11.0%10.0%9.6%10.1%9.8%
Washington1,884,7341,898,9831,904,1271,913,2301,927,6901,959,278
+/- m/m8,86714,2495,1449,10314,46031,588
% y/y#DIV/0!#DIV/0!5.8%5.9%6.0%7.2%
West Virginia519,992524,042524,922527,226530,494533,194
+/- m/m2,8714,0508802,3043,2682,700
% y/y6.5%6.8%6.4%5.9%5.9%5.7%
Wisconsin1,161,2021,166,2081,172,7191,179,2041,184,8991,190,673
+/- m/m5,2635,0066,5116,4855,6955,774
% y/y7.5%7.2%7.1%7.1%6.9%6.6%

Note: In Table 1 above and the state tables below, “+/- m/m” refers to the enrollment change from the previous month. “% y/y” refers to the percentage change in enrollment from the same month in the previous year.

Below, we provide a state-specific analysis of recent enrollment trends in the states where HMA tracks data.

It is important to note the limitations of the data presented. First, not all states report the data at the same time during the month. Some of these figures reflect beginning-of-the-month totals, while others reflect an end-of-the-month snapshot. Second, in some cases the data is comprehensive in that it covers all state-sponsored health programs for which the state offers managed care; in other cases, the data reflects only a subset of the broader Medicaid managed care population. This is the key limiting factor in comparing the data described below and figures reported by publicly traded Medicaid MCOs. Consequently, the data we review in Table 1 and throughout the In Focus section should be viewed as a sampling of enrollment trends across these states rather than a comprehensive comparison, which cannot be developed based on publicly available monthly enrollment data.

State-Specific Analysis

Arizona

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded January 1, 2014

Enrollment in Arizona’s two Medicaid managed care programs grew to 2.1 million in December 2022, up 7.1 percent from December 2021.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Acute Care2,002,5842,012,8022,028,3352,039,8802,049,3112,060,376
ALTCS66,46466,55866,76666,92067,13367,290
Total Arizona2,069,0482,079,3602,095,1012,106,8002,116,4442,127,666
+/- m/m8,52710,31215,74111,6999,64411,222
% y/y7.6%7.5%7.4%7.2%7.1%

California

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded January 1, 2014

Medi-Cal managed care enrollment was up 9.5 percent year-over-year to 13.2 million, as of December 2022.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Two-Plan Counties8,356,1378,409,8178,446,5148,481,8858,548,0968,588,418
Imperial/San Benito100,384101,117101,633102,064102,881103,437
Regional Model364,066366,437368,624370,361373,402375,473
GMC Counties1,435,2501,445,5321,452,1271,458,1491,470,1221,391,421
COHS Counties2,561,8312,578,7472,593,0032,608,7312,625,7952,634,112
Duals Demonstration111,832111,674111,526111,426111,697111,537
Total California12,929,50013,013,32413,073,42713,132,61613,231,99313,204,398
+/- m/m215,50683,82460,10359,18999,377(27,595)
% y/y9.8%9.9%9.9%9.9%10.2%9.5%

District of Columbia

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded January 1, 2014

Medicaid managed care enrollment in the District of Columbia was up 6.4 percent to almost 251,000 in November 2022.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22
Total District of Columbia246,957247,704248,577249,617250,676
+/- m/m3,2237478731,0401,059
% y/y6.7%6.7%6.5%6.5%6.4%

Florida

Medicaid Expansion Status: Not Expanded

Florida’s statewide Medicaid managed care program had seen an 11 percent rise in total covered lives over the last year to nearly 4.6 million beneficiaries as of December 2022. (Note that the managed LTC enrollment figures listed below are a subset of the Managed Medical Assistance (MMA) enrollments and are included in the MMA number; they are not separately added to the total to avoid double counting).

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
MMA3,908,5393,948,9293,978,0984,010,5344,041,8164,080,381
LTC (Subset of MMA)124,107124,691125,397126,144126,720126,621
SMMC Specialty Plan332,179338,057342,325346,516350,058355,638
FL Healthy Kids145,247145,247145,247145,247145,247145,247
Total Florida4,385,9654,432,2334,465,6704,502,2974,537,1214,581,266
+/- m/m41,44146,26833,43736,62734,82444,145
% y/y10.9%10.9%10.7%10.7%10.7%11.0%

Georgia

Medicaid Expansion Status: Not Expanded

As of December 2022, Georgia’s Medicaid managed care program covered more than 2 million members, up 8.3 percent from the previous year.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total Georgia1,975,2771,988,7272,016,4622,027,2752,035,673
+/- m/m13,11713,45010,8138,398
% y/y9.8%9.5%9.0%8.7%8.3%

Illinois

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded January 1, 2014

Illinois enrollment across the state’s managed care programs was up 5.5 percent to 3 million as of December 2022.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
HealthChoice2,800,4202,793,1242,809,6892,839,3422,874,7002,909,303
Duals Demonstration89,91290,90590,54390,24290,30791,414
Total Illinois2,890,3322,884,0292,900,2322,929,5842,965,0073,000,717
+/- m/m(8,672)(6,303)16,20329,35235,42335,710
% y/y5.1%4.5%4.1%4.4%5.1%5.5%

Indiana

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded in 2015 through HIP 2.0

As of December 2022, enrollment in Indiana’s managed care programs—Hoosier Healthwise, Hoosier Care Connect, and Healthy Indiana Program (HIP)—was more than 1.8 million, up 10.3 percent from the previous year.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Hoosier Healthwise845,910852,904857,952863,973869,613876,606
Hoosier Care Connect102,805102,819102,537102,253102,200102,150
HIP794,047805,969808,911815,238825,638834,288
Indiana Total1,742,7621,761,6921,769,4001,781,4641,797,4511,813,044
+/- m/m6,90618,9307,70812,06415,98715,593
% y/y11.6%11.3%11.0%10.5%10.2%10.3%

Iowa

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded January 1, 2014

Iowa launched its statewide Medicaid managed care program in April of 2016. Enrollment across all populations was nearly 814,500, as of December 2022. Enrollment was up 6.1 percent from the previous year.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Traditional Medicaid507,266510,618516,556520,234521,118
Iowa Wellness Plan237,910239,261242,555244,724246,385
hawk-i50,35849,86948,18547,52346,987
Total Iowa795,534799,748807,296812,481814,490
+/- m/m2,6424,2147,5482,009
% y/y5.9%5.8%6.4%6.0%6.1%

Kansas

Medicaid Expansion Status: Not Expanded

Kansas Medicaid managed care enrollment was nearly 501,000 as of December 2022, up 6.3 percent from the previous year.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total Kansas489,309490,911492,640497,257499,143500,814
+/- m/m2,6911,6021,7294,6171,8861,671
% y/y8.3%6.3%

Kentucky

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded January 1, 2014

As of December 2022, Kentucky covered more than 1.5 million beneficiaries in risk-based managed care. Total enrollment was up 6.1 percent from the prior year.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total Kentucky1,494,0681,487,3871,509,2741,518,9061,528,4841,534,657
+/- m/m6,069(6,681)21,8879,6329,5786,173
% y/y5.5%5.3%5.6%5.8%6.7%6.1%

Louisiana

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded July 1, 2016

Medicaid managed care enrollment in Louisiana was more than 1.86 million as of December 2022, up 5.8 percent from the previous year.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total Louisiana1,821,6441,828,0151,833,4571,841,6931,858,0921,860,170
+/- m/m7,2136,3715,4428,23616,3992,078
% y/y4.6%4.5%4.4%4.7%5.2%5.8%

Maryland

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded January 1, 2014

Maryland’s Medicaid managed care program covered more than 1.5 million lives as of December 2022.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total Maryland1,496,6771,502,2711,508,4691,514,3811,521,1711,529,308
+/- m/m8,2055,5946,1985,9126,7908,137
% y/y6.5%6.2%6.1%5.8%5.8%5.7%

Michigan

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded April 1, 2014

As of December 2022, Michigan’s Medicaid managed care was up 4.3 percent to 2.3 million.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Medicaid2,239,9372,251,8102,256,8002,265,2192,274,7632,279,473
MI Health Link (Duals)40,30642,62243,11344,69445,18844,573
Total Michigan2,280,2432,294,4322,299,9132,309,9132,319,9512,324,046
+/- m/m2,92314,1895,48110,00010,0384,095
% y/y3.8%3.6%3.5%3.7%4.5%4.3%

Minnesota

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded January 1, 2014

As of December 2022, enrollment across Minnesota’s multiple managed Medicaid programs was nearly 1.3 million, up 7.5 percent from the prior year.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Parents/Kids748,197748,513758,100763,044767,798770,918
Expansion Adults272,666273,387278,421281,284284,073288,680
Senior Care Plus24,19024,25225,34425,91426,41526,740
Senior Health Options43,42943,68643,92044,16244,24844,324
Special Needs BasicCare64,65664,48465,56265,76365,98766,171
Moving Home Minnesota11111010911
Minnesota Care107,963107,740107,597106,713105,328102,350
Total Minnesota1,261,1121,262,0731,278,9541,286,8901,293,8581,299,194
+/- m/m1,89396116,8817,9366,9685,336
% y/y7.3%6.7%7.4%7.5%7.5%7.5%

Mississippi

Medicaid Expansion Status: Not Expanded

MississippiCAN, the state’s Medicaid managed care program, had membership down 3.9 percent to nearly 397,000 as of December 2022.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total Mississippi367,137363,387364,612355,694367,902396,880
+/- m/m(452)(3,750)1,225(8,918)12,20828,978
% y/y-22.7%-19.9%-17.4%-17.3%-12.5%-3.9%

Missouri

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expansion Enrollment began in October 2021

Missouri managed care enrollment in the Medicaid and CHIP programs was nearly 1.2 million in December 2022.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total Medicaid758,928757,312769,419775,076782,863787,611
Total CHIP28,94928,93729,02629,12129,23129,402
Total AEG199,963228,361250,131262,612272,574287,692
Total SHK50,39950,60751,13151,56451,92152,300
Total Missouri1,038,2391,065,2171,099,7071,118,3731,136,5891,157,005
+/- m/m26,52026,97834,49018,66618,21620,416
% y/y27.0%29.1%32.6%31.7%31.8%29.0%

Nebraska

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded October 1, 2020

As of December 2022, Nebraska’s Medicaid managed care program enrolled 378,000 members, up 10.6 percent from the previous year.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total Nebraska363,328366,202369,770372,613374,857378,237
+/- m/m2,7402,8743,5682,8432,2443,380
% y/y12.4%11.9%11.7%11.2%10.8%10.6%

Nevada

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded January 1, 2014

Nevada’s Medicaid managed care enrollment was up 5.7 percent to nearly 693,000 as of December 2022.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total Nevada687,362689,139697,752675,465685,736692,890
+/- m/m9,4641,7778,613(22,287)10,2717,154
% y/y9.3%9.0%9.3%4.2%5.2%5.7%

New Jersey

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded January 1, 2014

As of December 2022, New Jersey Medicaid managed care enrollment was up 7 percent to nearly 2.2 million.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total New Jersey2,100,9472,113,9302,125,1812,130,8682,144,5142,158,966
+/- m/m10,89712,98311,2515,68713,64614,452
% y/y7.4%7.4%7.2%7.0%7.1%7.0%

New Mexico

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded January 1, 2014

As of December 2022, New Mexico’s Centennial Care program covered nearly 816,000 members, up 2.3 percent from the previous year.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total New Mexico809,991811,732812,995813,630814,466815,798
+/- m/m2,4911,7411,2636358361,332
% y/y4.2%3.7%3.4%3.0%2.6%2.3%

New York

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded January 1, 2014

New York’s Medicaid managed care programs collectively covered nearly 6 million beneficiaries as of December 2022, a 4.6 percent increase from the previous year. The Medicaid Advantage program ended in December 2021.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Mainstream MCOs5,399,0895,395,4895,418,9155,446,4095,467,4675,494,358
Managed LTC255,999256,538258,236257,360260,087264,965
Medicaid Advantage000000
Medicaid Advantage Plus34,35734,35534,68934,76434,71735,061
HARP164,514165,067165,024166,063165,340165,713
FIDA-IDD (Duals)1,6561,6591,6551,6681,6771,685
Total New York5,855,6155,853,1085,878,5195,906,2645,929,2885,961,782
+/- m/m39,970(2,507)25,41127,74523,02432,494
% y/y4.5%4.3%4.2%4.3%4.5%4.6%

North Carolina

Medicaid Expansion Status: Not Expanded

As of December 2022, enrollment in North Carolina’s Medicaid managed care program was 1.8 million, up 9.5 percent from the prior year. North Carolina implemented Medicaid managed care on July 1, 2021.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total North Carolina1,738,5451,746,9481,757,5031,768,9741,778,1991,837,423
+/- m/m9,0478,40310,55511,4719,22559,224
% y/y8.0%6.8%6.7%6.6%6.6%9.5%

Ohio

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded January 1, 2014

As of December 2022, enrollment across all four Ohio Medicaid managed care programs was nearly 3 million, up 0.9 percent from the prior year.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
CFC Program1,800,7811,800,0381,798,1351,796,3271,798,8731,804,860
ABD/Duals348,071348,176347,461347,371347,473347,839
Group 8 (Expansion)815,879815,402815,326814,968815,637821,064
Total Ohio2,964,7312,963,6162,960,9222,958,6662,961,9832,973,763
+/- m/m(1,340)(1,115)(2,694)(2,256)3,31711,780
% y/y3.4%2.6%1.9%1.4%1.0%0.9%

Oregon

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded January 1, 2014

As of December 2022, enrollment in the Oregon Coordinated Care Organization (CCO) Medicaid managed care program was more than 1.2 million, up 7.2 percent from the previous year.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total Oregon1,193,3581,202,1981,206,5201,211,0991,221,4351,228,054
+/- m/m3,9208,8404,3224,57910,3366,619
% y/y8.3%8.4%7.7%7.6%7.4%7.2%

Pennsylvania

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded January 1, 2015

As of December 2022, Pennsylvania’s Medicaid managed care enrollment was nearly 3 million, up 6.5 percent in the past year.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total Pennsylvania2,895,8372,909,9852,920,5842,937,0492,950,6132,966,207
+/- m/m13,97314,14810,59916,46513,56415,594
% y/y7.4%7.3%6.9%6.8%6.6%6.5%

South Carolina

Medicaid Expansion Status: Not Expanded

South Carolina’s Medicaid managed care programs collectively enrolled nearly 1.1 million members as of December 2022, which represents an increase of 7.5 percent in the past year.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total Medicaid1,041,9091,049,7061,056,0261,064,5481,071,0161,076,146
Total Duals Demo13,87613,73913,54313,54613,51313,431
Total South Carolina1,055,7851,063,4451,069,5691,078,0941,084,5291,089,577
+/- m/m5,2267,6606,1248,5256,4355,048
% y/y7.6%7.5%7.4%7.9%7.6%7.5%

Tennessee

Medicaid Expansion Status: Not Expanded

As of December 2022, TennCare managed care enrollment totaled 1.7 million, up 5.8 percent from the prior year.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total Tennessee1,692,3951,704,3981,710,1251,718,5391,726,6031,734,108
+/- m/m6,73712,0035,7278,4148,0647,505
% y/y6.0%6.1%6.1%6.0%5.9%5.8%

Texas

Medicaid Expansion Status: Not Expanded

Texas’ state fiscal year begins in September and program-specific enrollment is only reported at the end of each state fiscal quarter. As of November 2022, Texas Medicaid managed care enrollment was nearly 5.7 million across the state’s six managed care programs, up 10.6 percent from the previous year.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
STAR4,559,2934,748,820
STAR+PLUS559,746568,456
STAR HEALTH45,76046,228
Duals Demo34,33633,673
CHIP97,15385,773
STAR KIDS169,757170,219
Total Texas5,466,0455,653,169
+/- m/m
% y/y8.6%10.6%

Virginia

Medicaid Expansion Status: January 1, 2019

Virginia Medicaid managed care enrollment was up 9.8 percent in December 2022 to 1.6 million members.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total Virginia1,572,9231,582,9731,589,7221,598,8751,608,8401,619,311
+/- m/m11,82910,0506,7499,1539,96510,471
% y/y11.3%11.0%10.0%9.6%10.1%9.8%

Washington

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded January 1, 2014

Washington’s Medicaid managed care enrollment increased 7.2 percent to nearly 2 million as of December 2022, compared to the previous year.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total Washington1,884,7341,898,9831,904,1271,913,2301,927,6901,959,278
+/- m/m8,86714,2495,1449,10314,46031,588
% y/y#DIV/0!#DIV/0!5.8%5.9%6.0%7.2%

West Virginia

Medicaid Expansion Status: Expanded January 1, 2014

As of December 2022, West Virginia’s Medicaid managed care program covered 533,000 members, up 5.7 percent year-over-year.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
Total West Virginia519,992524,042524,922527,226530,494533,194
+/- m/m2,8714,0508802,3043,2682,700
% y/y6.5%6.8%6.4%5.9%5.9%5.7%

Wisconsin

Medicaid Expansion Status: Not Expanded

Across Wisconsin’s three Medicaid managed care programs, December 2022 enrollment totaled nearly 1.2 million, up 6.6 percent from the year before.

Jul-22Aug-22Sep-22Oct-22Nov-22Dec-22
BadgerCare+1,042,4561,047,2171,053,3611,059,5871,065,1821,070,788
SSI61,84161,91662,06562,12962,16562,293
LTC56,90557,07557,29357,48857,55257,592
Total Wisconsin1,161,2021,166,2081,172,7191,179,2041,184,8991,190,673
+/- m/m5,2635,0066,5116,4855,6955,774
% y/y7.5%7.2%7.1%7.1%6.9%6.6%

More Information Available from HMA Information Services

More detailed information on the Medicaid managed care landscape is available from HMA Information Services (HMAIS), which collects Medicaid enrollment data, health plan financials, and the latest on expansions, waivers, duals, ABD populations, long-term care, accountable care organizations, and patient-centered medical homes. HMAIS also includes a public documents library with copies of Medicaid RFPs, responses, model contracts, and scoring sheets.

HMAIS enhances this publicly available information with an overview of the structure of Medicaid in each state, as well as proprietary Medicaid Managed Care RFP calendars.

For additional information on how to subscribe to HMA Information Services, contact Carl Mercurio at 212-575-5929.

[1] Arizona, California, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin.

CMS announces plans to pursue new Medicare and Medicaid drug payment models

This week our In Focus section reviews the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ (CMS) announcement that the agency will explore three new prescription drug payment models in the Medicare and Medicaid programs:

  • Medicare High-Value Drug List Model
  • Cell and Gene Therapy (CGT) Access Model
  • Accelerating Clinical Evidence Model

The announcement – and accompanying report – responds to President Biden’s October 2022 Executive Order directing CMS’ Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (the Innovation Center) to identify models that could lower cost sharing for commonly used drugs and include value-based payment for drugs.

Notably, the Innovation Center offered varying levels of specificity about the models, leaving unanswered many questions about the structures and timelines for the potential models. The Innovation Center will need to conduct more robust analysis to determine the design specifications for each model, stakeholder interest, and practical and political feasibility for each. In addition, each model will need to have its own application or rulemaking process to identify participants and other key model parameters. While this makes it difficult for the Innovation Center to specify timelines, it provides stakeholders some flexibility to analyze and develop recommendations for the potential models over the next several months.

HMA’s experts are also closely tracking CMS’ work on additional areas identified for the agency to research. For example, CMS could consider other regulatory pathways, partnerships, or campaigns to promote the following changes:

  • Opportunities to encourage price transparency for prescription drugs
  • Options to improve biosimilar adoption
  • Medicare fee-for-service options to support CGT access and affordability

The drug payment models build on other federal and state-level efforts to address prescription drug costs and total cost of care initiatives. For example, CMS’ drug payment model announcement comes just a week after the agency released its implementation approach for the drug payment policies approved as part of the inflation Reduction Act of 2022 (IRA) (P.L. 117-169). CMS is balancing the extensive implementation needs for the IRA while also acknowledging the new law may not directly address other value-based considerations impacting cost and access for certain prescription medications.

Below are some of the highlights of the Innovation Center’s drug payment models.

Medicare High Value Drug List Model

The Medicare High Value Drug List model would provide standardized approach to cost sharing for specified Part D medications. CMS suggests a standardized list with consistent cost-sharing to allow providers to easily identify and prescribe appropriate medications. Part D Sponsors could offer a Medicare-defined standard set of approximately 150 high-value generic drugs with a maximum co-payment of $2 for a month’s supply. Under this model, generic drugs included in the standardized list would not be subject to step therapy, prior authorization, quantity limits, or pharmacy network restrictions.

According to the report, CMS could explore leveraging existing systems, which would allow for a streamlined implementation. CMS also plans to seek input from beneficiaries, Part D Sponsors, manufacturers, and providers, but the agency did not provide a more specific timeline for announcing the Model specifications and start date.

Cell and Gene Therapy (CGT) Access

The Cell and Gene Therapy (CGT) Access model would be a voluntary opportunity for states and manufacturers. The model builds on existing state Medicaid initiatives to develop outcomes-based agreements (OBAs) with certain manufacturers of high-cost and breakthrough medications. CMS suggests the multistate test could inform a more permanent framework for evaluating, financing, and delivering CGTs on a broader scale. This model may also help address complexities with the federal drug rebate requirements in states that wish to pursue value-based contracting arrangements. Under this model a state Medicaid agency could choose to adopt the CMS structure for multi-state OBAs with participating manufacturers. CMS would be responsible for implementing, monitoring, reconciling, and evaluating financial and clinical outcomes. Initially the model would focus on CGTs for illnesses like sickle cell disease and cancer.  This approach could remove some of the barriers that have slowed state uptake of OBAs.

CMS plans to begin model development in 2023, announce the model sometime in 2024-25, and test it as early as 2026.

Accelerating Clinical Evidence Model

The Innovation Center is considering mandatory participation for Medicare Part B providers in the Accelerating Clinical Evidence Model. Under this potential model, the agency would adjust Medicare Part B payment amounts for Accelerated Approval Program (AAP) drugs to determine if adjustments incentivize manufacturers to timely complete trials, which in turn may facilitate earlier availability of clinical evidence.

The Innovation Center identified some challenging aspects for this model and stated the agency will need to consult with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2023 to consider approaches for this model. Statements from agency officials about the model also indicate the need for consultation with the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) and other stakeholders, including through an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking.

If the Innovation Center determines this model is feasible, the agency will provide more details about a targeted launch. The Innovation Center has previously attempted to implement mandatory Part B drug payment models but never implemented them due to legal challenges and stakeholder opposition.

HMA and HMA companies will continue to analyze these potential models and initiatives developing in parallel with the Innovation Center’s work. We have the depth and breadth of expertise to assist with tailored analysis, to model policy impacts of the potential models, and to support the drafting of feedback to CMS as it considers these options.

If you have questions about the Innovation Center’s proposed models and how it will affect manufacturers, Medicare providers, Medicaid programs and patients, contact Amy Bassano ([email protected]), Kevin Kirby ([email protected]) or Andrea Maresca ([email protected]).

CMS creating a ‘Universal Foundation’ to align quality measures

Leaders at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced in the New England Journal of Medicine this month a new initiative called the “Universal Foundation,” which seeks to align quality measures across the more than 20 CMS quality initiatives. The implications for the broader healthcare system are immense. 

At Health Management Associates upcoming quality conference March 6 in Chicago, Dr. Lee Fleisher, one of the authors of the Universal Foundation initiative and, Chief Medical Officer and Director, CMS’ Center for Clinical Standards and Quality, will deliver the keynote address “A Vision for Healthcare Quality: How Policy Can Drive Improved Outcomes.”

Attendees will hear from industry leaders and policy makers about evolving healthcare quality initiatives and participate in substantive workshops where they will learn about and discuss solutions that are using quality frameworks to create a more equitable health system. In addition to Dr. Fleisher, featured speakers will include executives from American College of Surgeons, ANCOR, CareJourney, CareOregon, Commonwealth Care Alliance, Council on Quality and Leadership, Denver Health, Institute on Public Policy for People with Disabilities, Intermountain Health, NCQA, Reema Health, Kaiser Permanente, Social Interventions Research and Evaluation Network, UnitedHealth Group, United Hospital Fund, 3M, and many other organizations.

The Universal Foundation seeks to align quality measures to “focus providers’ attention on measures that are meaningful for the health of broad segments of the population; reduce provider burden by streamlining and aligning measures; advance equity with the use of measures that will help CMS recognize and track disparities in care among and within populations; aid the transition from manual reporting of quality measures to seamless, automatic digital reporting; and permit comparisons among various quality and value-based care programs, to help the agency better understand what drives quality improvement and what does not.”

CMS has established a cross-center working group focused on coordination of these processes and on development and implementation of aligned measures to support a consistent approach. As part of this announcement, the group published a list of Preliminary Adult and Pediatric Universal Foundation Measures. This new quality program will affect clinicians, healthcare settings such as hospitals or skilled nursing facilities, health insurers, and value-based entities such as accountable care organizations.

HMA can help organizations improve their quality efforts in line with the new CMS Universal Foundation initiative. HMA’s more than 500 consultants include past roles as senior officials in Medicaid and Medicare, directors of large nonprofit and social services organizations, top-level advisors, C-level executives at hospitals, health systems and health plans, and senior-level physicians. Our depth of industry-leading policy expertise and clinical experience provides comprehensive solutions that make healthcare and human services work better for people.

To learn more about HMA and Quality, follow #HMAtalksQuality on Twitter and LinkedIn. View the full agenda and register for HMA’s first annual quality conference on March 6 in Chicago. Registration closes on February 21, 2023.

California first in nation to receive federal approval for justice-involved reentry demonstration initiative

This week, our In Focus section reviews the California amendment to the Section 1115 Waiver Demonstration titled, “California Advancing and Innovating Medi-Cal (CalAIM),” approved by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) on January 26, 2023. The amendment will provide targeted Medi-Cal services to individuals in state prisons, county jails, and youth correctional facilities for up to 90 days prior to release. This marks the first time in the nation that Medicaid will pay for a limited set of health care services provided to justice-involved individuals before they are released. The approval is effective through the end of the CalAIM demonstration, ending December 31, 2026, unless extended or amended.

The justice-involved initiative is part of the broader CalAIM demonstration, approved December 29, 2021. For more information on CalAIM, please see HMA’s write up from March 2021.

Background

California was one of the first of 11 states – Arizona, California, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Montana, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Utah, Vermont, and Washington – to propose a demonstration to provide Medicaid-covered healthcare services to justice-involved populations before release. CMS plans to issue guidance on the Reentry Demonstration Opportunity to support community reentry and improvement in care transitions for individuals up to 30 days prior to their scheduled release.

California’s reentry demonstration initiative aims to address the needs of incarcerated beneficiaries as they near the end of their incarceration and reenter the community by improving connections and coordination between the correctional, health care, and social service systems. Currently, Medi-Cal services are only available after release from incarceration.

In California, more than one million adults and youth enter or are released from prisons and jails annually, with at least 80 percent eligible for Medi-Cal. The justice-involved individuals are disproportionately people of color, compared to the state population. Formerly incarcerated individuals are also more likely to experience poor health outcomes and face disproportionately higher rates of physical and behavioral health diagnoses. These individuals are at higher risk for injury and death as a result of violence, overdose, and suicide compared to people who have never been incarcerated.

Demonstration

California will be required to submit for CMS approval a Reentry Initiative Implementation Plan and Reinvestment Plan documenting how the state will operationalize coverage and provision of pre-release services and how existing state funding for carceral health services will continue to support access to necessary care and achievement of positive health outcomes for the justice-involved population.

The goals of the demonstration are to:

  • Increase coverage, continuity of coverage, and appropriate service uptake through assessment of eligibility and availability of coverage for benefits in carceral settings just prior to release;
  • Improve access to services prior to release and improve transitions and continuity of care into the community upon release;
  • Improve coordination and communication between correctional systems, Medicaid and CHIP systems, managed care plans, and community-based providers;
  • Increase additional investments in health care and related services, aimed at improving the quality of care for beneficiaries in carceral settings and in the community to maximize successful reentry post-release;
  • Improve connections between carceral settings and community services upon release to address physical health, behavioral health, and health-related social needs;
  • Provide intervention for certain behavioral health conditions and using stabilizing medications like long-acting injectable anti-psychotics and medications for addiction treatment for SUDs, with the goal of reducing decompensation, suicide-related deaths, overdoses, and overdose-related deaths in the near-term post-release; and
  • Reduce post-release acute care utilizations such as emergency department (ED) visits and inpatient hospitalizations and all-cause deaths among recently incarcerated Medicaid beneficiaries and individuals otherwise eligible for CHIP if not for their incarceration status through robust pre-release identification, stabilization, and management of certain serious physical and behavioral health conditions that may respond to ambulatory care and treatment (e.g., diabetes, heart failure, hypertension, schizophrenia, SUDs) as well as increased receipt of preventive and routine physical and behavioral health care.”

Eligible individuals under the demonstration will be assigned a care manager while they are incarcerated, as well as a community-based care manager upon their release. Pre-release services will be anchored in comprehensive care management and include physical and behavioral clinical consultation, lab and radiology, Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT), community health worker services, and medications and durable medical equipment. These services will be available for up to 90 days immediately prior to the individual’s expected release date. California expects that it will be able to reduce decompensation, suicide-related death, overdose, and overdose-related deaths in the near-term post-release.

As a condition of approval of this demonstration amendment, CMS is also requiring California to make pre-release outreach, along with eligibility and enrollment support, available to all individuals incarcerated in the facilities in which the demonstration is functioning. Effective January 1, 2023, state statute directs all counties implementing Medi-Cal application processes in county jails and youth correctional facilities to “suspend” their status while an individual is in jail or prison, and easily “turn on” when they enter the community so they can access essential health care services upon release.

The demonstration is expected to begin in April 2024. Correctional facilities can choose their launch date within 24 months of the go-live date and will be subject to a readiness review process before they can launch.

Additional Requirements

Under the amendment, CMS approved the state’s Designated State Health Program (DSHP) financing plan. Under this DSHP, California will receive federal matching funds to support the Providing Access and Transforming Health (PATH) program. As a condition of receiving this funding and as part of the approval, CMS requires California to increase and sustain Medicaid fee-for-service provider payment rates and Medicaid managed care payment rates for obstetrics, primary care, and behavioral health services. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), “in obstetrics alone, this represents the potential for $60 million to be invested in the health of pregnant and postpartum women by increasing access to providers and therein improving health outcomes for pregnant women.” The rate increase will close the gap between Medicaid and Medicare rates by at least 2 percentage points, should the state’s average Medicaid to Medicare provider rate ratio be below 80 percent in any of these categories.

Under this amendment, CMS is also updating the budget neutrality methodology for two previously approved community supports, short-term post-hospitalization services and recuperative care, that address health-related social needs.

Link to Waiver Amendment

Lee Fleisher of CMS to keynote HMA national quality conference

Join us on Monday, March 6, 2023, at the Fairmont Chicago, Millennium Park, for “Healthcare Quality Conference: A Deep Dive on What’s Next for Providers, Payers, and Policymakers,” where Lee Fleisher, MD, chief medical officer and director of CMS’ Center for Clinical Standards and Quality, will deliver the keynote titled A Vision for Healthcare Quality: How Policy Can Drive Improved Outcomes.

HMA’s first annual quality conference will provide organizations the opportunity to “Focus on Quality to Improve Patients’ Lives.” Attendees will hear from industry leaders and policy makers about evolving health care quality initiatives and participate in substantive workshops where they will learn about and discuss solutions that are using quality frameworks to create a more equitable health system.

In addition to Fleisher, featured speakers will executives from ANCOR, CareOregon, Commonwealth Care Alliance, Council on Quality and Leadership, Intermountain Healthcare, NCQA, Reema Health, Kaiser Permanente, United Hospital Fund, and others.

Working sessions will provide expert-led discussions about how quality is driving federal and state policy, behavioral health integration, approaches to improving equity and measuring the social determinants of health, integration of disability support services, stronger Medicaid core measures, strategies for Medicare Star Ratings, value-based payments, and digital measures and measurement tools. Speakers will provide case studies and innovative approaches to ensuring quality efforts result in lasting improvements in health outcomes.

“What’s different about this conference is that participants will engage in working sessions that provide healthcare executives tools and models for directly impacting quality at their organizations,” said Carl Mercurio, Principal and Publisher, HMA Information Services. 

View the Full Agenda

Early Bird registration ends January 30. Visit the conference website for complete details or contact Carl Mercurio at 212-575-5929/[email protected].  Group rates and sponsorships are available.

Register Now

HMA in Health Affairs Forefront: imminent VFC decisions are critical for RSV therapy access

As respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a seasonal pathogen in young children is challenging the national health care system as part of an unprecedented “tripledemic” with COVID-19 and flu this winter, HMA authors weigh in on potential coverage pathways for new monoclonal antibody (mAb) preventive therapies for RSV and their implications for access. 

The Vaccines for Children (VFC) program is a proven vehicle for ensuring comprehensive coverage of immunizations based on recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). An ACIP workgroup is actively discussing potential recommendations for immunization with RSV mAbs. 

In the recent Health Affairs Forefront article, “Coverage By Vaccines For Children Program Is Critical For RSV Therapy Access,” HMA authors Helen DuPlessis, MD, FAAP, Diana Rodin, and Matt Wimmer explore the implications of ACIP recommendations, Medicaid coverage pathways, and children’s access to the new therapies.

Congress sets date for Medicaid “unwinding”: what now?

This week, our In Focus section reviews changes to Medicaid’s COVID-19 Public Health Emergency (PHE) unwinding. People enrolled in the Medicaid program have been continuously enrolled for almost three years, but that situation is about to change. In December 2022, Congress passed and the President signed into law a massive compromise bill to fund the government. It includes an important change to Medicaid’s continuous enrollment policy, which has been in effect since the early days of the COVID-19 PHE in March 2020.

Congress passed the Families First Coronavirus Relief Act (FFCRA) in March 2020. This legislation has allowed states to receive a 6.2 percentage point increase in their federal matching rate for Medicaid. As a condition for receiving the enhanced funding, states have been prohibited from disenrolling individuals who were otherwise determined ineligible for Medicaid. As a result, nearly 20 million more people are now enrolled in the Medicaid program.

The 2023 spending bill severs the link between the COVID-19 PHE declaration, the continuous enrollment requirement, and the higher federal match rate. The new law:

  • Ends the Medicaid continuous coverage policy on March 31, 2023, even if the PHE declaration remains in effect. States may begin issuing terminations of ineligible individuals as early as February 1, with an effective date of April 1.
  • Phases down the 6.2 percentage point increase in the federal matching rate rather than ending it abruptly at the end of the PHE as required under the FFCRA. Specifically, the increase will drop to 5 percentage points in April−June 2023, 2.5 percentage points in July−September 2023, and 1.5 percentage points in October−December 2023.
  • Does not end the PHE or other flexibilities linked to the PHE.

Congress also added new parameters and reporting requirements for states as they resume annual eligibility renewals with coverage cancellation for individuals who no longer qualify. These requirements are in addition to data the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) previously directed states to report. For example:

  • States must maintain up-to-date enrollee contact information for individuals who will undergo an eligibility redetermination.
  • States cannot disenroll individuals based only on returned mail.
  • Prior to disenrolling an individual, the state must make a “good faith effort” to contact the person using more than one communication mode.
  • States must submit to CMS “on a timely basis” a report explaining their eligibility redetermination activities.
  • States must submit data related to individuals whose eligibility information was transferred between Medicaid and the Marketplace, with some exceptions for states that have integrated Medicaid and Marketplace eligibility systems and those that use the Federally Facilitated Marketplace.

Beyond the “Delinking”

The new law includes other important eligibility-related policies that may affect state and stakeholder planning for what is often referred to as the “unwinding” of continuous enrollment. Notably, the state Medicaid and CHIP programs will now be required to provide 12 months of continuous coverage for children. A total of 24 states already have adopted the 12-month continuous eligibility option for all children enrolled in Medicaid. While the new requirement will not take effect until January 1, 2024, additional states could adopt this option as they resume normal eligibility operations.

In addition, the new law makes permanent the option for states to extend Medicaid postpartum coverage to 12 months, up from 60 days. The one-year postpartum coverage option initially was approved in the American Rescue Plan but for a limited period of five years. Making the option permanent provides more certainty for states. Nearly two-thirds of states have already implemented or are planning to implement the 12-month postpartum coverage extension.

What Happens Next?

The definitive end date for the continuous enrollment policy sets in motion certain federal and state actions and the process for unwinding. On January 5, 2023, CMS published its first guidance to states on processes related to the new unwinding date. The agency is developing additional guidance and will use other communication tools to provide states with greater clarity on the new statutory reporting, matching rate, and federal agency expectations and oversight.

State plans: All states must submit unwinding plans to CMS by February 15; however, February 1 is the deadline for states that intend to begin renewals in February. These proposals must provide details regarding unwinding strategies, the timeline for starting enrollee renewals, and the pace of ongoing renewal processes. The specific end date for the continuous enrollment policy is driving more states to review and finalize their initiatives and engage with stakeholders.

Impact on health plans and providers: The unwinding process will create important decision points and considerations for Medicaid health plans and providers that have members and patients whom the unwinding process may affect in the next 12-18 months. The law’s requirements reinforce the imperative for states, Medicaid health plans, providers, and other partners to renew efforts to confirm enrollee contact information. The unwinding all will create new considerations for Medicaid health plans with respect to enrollee support, case mix, and rate setting issues.

State budgets and legislation: Many states will kick off their legislative sessions this month. The unwinding process—especially the phase-out of higher federal funding—has important implications for state budgets. State legislatures also may address the new continuous eligibility requirements for children and the permanent option for 12 months of postpartum coverage. As a result, Medicaid will likely remain a top priority during upcoming legislative sessions.

Federal oversight and enforcement: The law’s enhanced reporting provision is intended to provide safeguards to ensure eligible individuals remain enrolled in Medicaid. The reporting also focuses on data related to identifying and directing individuals likely to be eligible for the Marketplace program. Although CMS must publicly report these data, the agency has offered no specific timeline for posting the information. Notably CMS has oversight tools and may impose financial penalties on states that are noncompliant with the unwinding requirements.

Forthcoming federal guidance will confirm the parameters for state unwinding actions, CMS’s plans for oversight of state work, and how these efforts affect current Medicaid enrollees. Medicaid partners should closely monitor state level actions, including announcement of state unwinding plans and opportunities for collaboration. Earlier blogs describe the strategies and actions HMA is working with states and partners to undertake as they prepare for this significant change in Medicaid eligibility policies.

Please contact HMA experts Beth KidderJane LongoMichael Cohen, and Andrea Maresca with questions and for more information.

2022 Yearly Roundup: a year of successful partnerships

The holiday season is grounded in gratitude. At HMA, we are grateful for successful partnerships that have fueled change to improve lives.

We are proud to be trusted advisors to our clients and partners. Their success is our success. In 2022 our clients and partners made significant strides tackling the biggest healthcare challenges, seizing opportunities for growth and innovation, and shaping the healthcare landscape in a way that improves the health and wellness of individuals and communities.

Reforming Colorado’s Behavioral Health System

HMA partnered with the Colorado Department of Human Services to support the planning and implementation of a new Behavioral Health Administration (BHA). HMA provided technical research and extensive stakeholder engagement, drafted models for forming and implementing the BHA, employed an extensive change management approach, and created a detailed implementation plan with ongoing support. Today the BHA is a cabinet member-led agency that collaborates across agencies and sectors to drive a comprehensive and coordinated strategic approach to behavioral health.

From Bid to Trusted Advisor

Wakely Consulting Group, an HMA Company, was engaged to support the launch of a Medicare Advantage (MA) joint venture partnership between a health plan and a provider system. Wakely was responsible for preparing and certifying MA and Medicare Part D (PD) bids, a highly complex, exacting, and iterative effort. The Wakely team quickly became a trusted advisor and go-to resource for the joint venture decision makers. The joint venture has driven significant market growth over its initial years, fueled by a competitive benefit package determined by the client product team.

Laying the Foundation for Modernizing Indiana’s Public Health System

In 2021 Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb appointed a 15-member commission to assess Indiana’s public health system and make recommendations for improvements. The Indiana Department of Health (IDOH) engaged HMA to provide extensive project management and support for six workstreams. HMA prepared a draft report summarizing public input as well as research findings and recommendations. The commission’s final report will form the basis of proposed 2023 legislation, including proposals to substantially increase public health service and funding across the state.

Multiple Clients Accepted into ACO REACH Model

In early 2022 HMA and Wakely Consulting Group, an HMA Company, assisted multiple clients with their applications to participate in the new CMS ACO REACH model. The purpose of this model is to improve quality of care for Medicare beneficiaries through better care coordination and increased engagement between providers and patients including those who are underserved. The team tailored their support depending on each client’s needs. The application selection process was highly competitive. Of the 271 applications received, CMS accepted just under 50 percent. Notably, nine out of the 10 organizations HMA and Wakely supported were accepted into the model.

Pipeline Research and Policy Recommendations to Address New Innovative Therapies

HMA, and subsidiaries The Moran Company and Leavitt Partners, were selected by a large pharmaceutical manufacturer to analyze the current pipeline of innovative therapies, examine reimbursement policies to assess long-term compatibility with the adoption of innovative therapies and novel delivery mechanisms, and make policy recommendations to address any challenges identified through the process. The project equipped the client with a holistic understanding of future potential impacts and actions to address challenges in a detailed pipeline analysis of innovative therapies.

Oklahoma rereleases Medicaid Managed Care RFPs

This week, our In Focus reviews the Oklahoma Medicaid managed care SoonerSelect Program request for proposals (RFP) and the SoonerSelect Children’s Specialty Program RFP released by the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA) on November 10, 2022.

Background

Oklahoma currently does not have a fully capitated, risk-based Medicaid managed care program. The majority of the state’s 1.3 million Medicaid members are in SoonerCare Choice, a Primary Care Case Management (PCCM) program in which each member has a medical home. Other programs include SoonerCare Traditional (Medicaid fee-for-service), SoonerPlan (a limited benefit family planning program), and Insure Oklahoma (a premium assistance program for low-income people whose employers offer health insurance).

Prior efforts to transition to Medicaid managed care have encountered roadblocks, starting in 2017 with a failed attempt to move aged, blind, and disabled members to managed care.

More recently, in June 2021, the Oklahoma Supreme Court struck down a planned transition of the state’s traditional Medicaid program to managed care, ruling that the Oklahoma Health Care Authority does not have the authority to implement the program without legislative approval.

Contracts had been awarded to Blue Cross Blue Shield of Oklahoma, Humana, Centene/Oklahoma Complete Health, and UnitedHealthcare. Centene/Oklahoma Complete Health also won an award for the SoonerSelect Children’s Specialty Program.

In May 2022, Governor Kevin Stitt signed a new Oklahoma law to implement Medicaid managed care by October 1, 2023.

SoonerSelect RFP

Oklahoma will award contracts to at least three entities to provide medical, behavioral, and pharmacy coverage to nearly one million eligible children, pregnant women, newborns, parents and caretake relatives, and the expansion population. However, enrollment in these populations is expected to drop following the end of the public health emergency (PHE).

At least one of the contracts may be awarded to a provider-led entity (PLE). PLEs would need to provide proof that a majority of their ownership is held by Oklahoma Medicaid providers or the majority of the governing body is composed of individuals who have experience serving Medicaid members and are licensed providers. PLEs would also be able to bid on urban regions if the PLE agrees to develop statewide readiness within a timeframe set by the OHCA. If no PLEs meet OHCA standards, Oklahoma can choose not to award a PLE.

Goals of the program will include:

  • Improve health outcomes for Medicaid members and the state as a whole
  • Ensure budget predictability through shared risk and accountability
  • Ensure access to care, quality measures, and member satisfaction
  • Ensure efficient and cost-effective administrative systems and structures
  • Ensure a sustainable delivery system that is a provider-led effort and that is operated and managed by providers to the maximum extent possible.

Timeline

Proposals will be due on February 8, 2023, and contract implementation is scheduled for October 1, 2023. The contract is expected to run through June 30, 2024, with five, one-year options.

Evaluation

Bidder’s technical proposals will be scored out of a total 1550 points. OHCA will award PLEs an additional 50 points for qualifying, bringing the total up to 1600 points. OHCA may also choose to conduct oral presentations for an extra total of 50 points.

SoonerSelect Children’s Specialty Program RFP

Oklahoma will select one of the awarded SoonerSelect plans for a separate statewide contract to provide comprehensive integrated health coverage to foster children, former foster children up to 25 years of age, juvenile justice-involved children, and children receiving adoption assistance. Contract terms will be the same as the main SoonSelect procurement, running from October 1, 2023, through June 30, 2024, with five one-year renewal options.

Link to RFPs

Should you put the PHE’s Medicaid unwinding at the top of your to-do list?

While the current federal COVID-19 Public Health Emergency (PHE) declaration could be in place through the winter months, HMA’s team of experts see many reasons to put the PHE’s Medicaid unwinding planning at the top of your list now.

Without an extension, the PHE declaration will expire on January 11, 2023. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) officials pledged to provide 60-days’ notice before ending the PHE. As a result, since HHS did not announce an extension by November 12, we can assume that HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra will extend the PHE beyond January.

However, congressional leaders are again considering proposals that would impact the PHE’s Medicaid policies. Such a change could advance during the lame duck session of Congress. For a variety of reasons, lawmakers could seek a statutory change that would de-link Medicaid’s continuous enrollment requirement, the 6.2 percentage point increase in the federal Medicaid match, and other Medicaid maintenance of effort policies from the PHE declaration. Congress could set a specific date for ending these Medicaid policies. Doing so would provide more certainty for planning for the end of the continuous Medicaid enrollment policy and its downstream implications for health insurance programs.

What can Medicaid agencies, health plans, providers and other stakeholders do now?

The transition from Medicaid’s continuous enrollment requirement to normal eligibility operations involves a myriad of policy decisions and operational changes that will impact enrollees. In turn, the end of Medicaid’s continuous coverage policy will also have great bearing on the business and operational strategies of managed care plans, providers and other stakeholders participating in the Medicaid and Marketplace programs.

HMA’s experts are working with state agencies, health plans, hospitals and health systems, and other stakeholders to identify options and workable solutions to prepare for these major changes. This work touches policy, organizational workstreams, systems, and payment. There are issues specific to Medicaid as well as the intersection with Marketplace, the Supplemental Nutrition Program (SNAP), and other public programs.

Combining our collective on-the-ground experience in states with our federal policy insights, experts from across the HMA family of companies list below themes and immediate actions stakeholders can consider. These action steps are focused on ensuring states, managed care plans, providers and other stakeholders are prepared to immediately respond to the end of the Medicaid continuous enrollment policy and work with individuals to provide information and other support they may need to stay enrolled in a coverage program.

1. Monitor and prepare for federal activities, particularly during the lame duck session of Congress and into 2023. Healthcare policies are likely to feature prominently in Congress’ lame duck session in November and December. Decoupling the Medicaid continuous enrollment and enhanced Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP) policies from the PHE is one issue under consideration. Any statutory changes to these policies may also include new requirements for the unwinding process. Stakeholders will want to closely monitor these discussions.

If Congress sets a statutory end date for the PHE’s Medicaid eligibility policies, this will provide the certainty needed for states to finalize PHE unwinding action plans with target dates for resuming normal eligibility operations. Notably, this may also drive conversations during states’ 2023 legislative sessions.

Consider the impact to your state and your organization – and any decisions you’ll be faced with – if the enhanced FMAP is decoupled from the PHE.  For example, if your state had the option to maintain continuous eligibility without the enhanced FMAP, would it do so?  States and stakeholders will want to revisit their Medicaid unwinding plans, consider options for meeting any new requirements, and update existing plans accordingly. Also, stakeholders can offer to serve as a resource to your state Medicaid agency and/or Congressional delegation regarding lame duck legislative proposals pertaining to Medicaid and the PHE.

2. Stay informed about state-specific landscapes. With statewide elections largely decided and expectations for a PHE end date sometime in the first part of 2023, now is the time for stakeholders to revisit when and how to engage with state Medicaid and other state agencies to support Medicaid eligibility unwinding plans. Stakeholders will want to solidify strategies and timing for engaging with states as unwinding plans are further solidified and eventually implemented.

Stakeholders can also monitor changes to states’ eligibility and enrollment rules – including initiatives designed to simplify eligibility rules, enhance eligibility and enrollment systems, and adjust managed care rate setting policies, among others. Many states are utilizing the temporary federal Medicaid flexibilities to alleviate the significant eligibility unwinding workload. Federal agencies also continue to regularly publish new information for states and stakeholders to consider. Some states are implementing policies designed to improve the transition from Medicaid to Marketplace. Understanding the implications of such policies will help stakeholders anticipate how ending Medicaid’s continuous coverage requirement will directly affect them.

3. Refresh strategies and messaging for outreach and assistance. While the PHE end date remains in flux, state plans for ending the Medicaid continuous coverage policy are still evolving. States are refining their beneficiary communication plans and may be developing updated guidance for stakeholders. Health plans, providers, and other stakeholders should align their messaging and outreach work accordingly and continue to build partnerships in communities across the state.

However, outreach alone will not be enough to reach all Medicaid enrollees. Many will need assistance in understanding and complying with changes that come with the end of the continuous enrollment policy. For example, stakeholder-provided redetermination assistance will be key to minimizing the number of enrollees who lose coverage for failure to complete the redetermination process and state requirements for stakeholder assistance will vary state by state.  

4. Update projected impact of enrollee transitions between Medicaid and Marketplace programs. For states and stakeholders, especially health plans, it is time to update projections about 2023 Medicaid and Marketplace enrollment. This may also require new analysis and strategies to address the changing population acuity and resulting impact on capitation revenue. For healthcare providers, health systems, and other healthcare facilities, the end of the Medicaid continuous enrollment policy is expected to drive significant changes in payer mix, and it could reduce revenue as well as impact qualifications for special payment programs, the 340B program, among others. Understanding these dynamics can help with budgeting and implementation of specific patient outreach and support strategies.

5. Develop strategies to translate experiences from Medicaid to Marketplace. Medicaid agencies, managed care plans, and providers have gained valuable insights about the needs of individuals who have remained continuously enrolled in Medicaid during the COVID-19 PHE. This is particularly true for Medicaid enrollees diagnosed with a mental illness, substance use disorder, or both. Medicaid providers and health plans have gained valuable insight on effective clinical care models, whole person care, partnerships with community-based organizations and reimbursement strategies that can better meet the needs of complex populations. Providers and plans can utilize these experiences to better support the millions of individuals who are expected to become eligible for Marketplace coverage after Medicaid’s continuous enrollment policy ends.

The HMA team continues to monitor the dynamic state and federal policy landscapes, including state planning documents and new federal guidance and informational tools. We have the ability to support stakeholders to prepare for the end of PHE and to support state and communities by modeling projected enrollment and payer mix changes across health coverage categories. Stakeholders should be using this time to address gaps in their plans for PHE unwinding and continue to identify and evaluate new options that may emerge to support beneficiaries in retaining health coverage.

This blog was written by Jane Longo, Andrea Maresca and Bill Snyder.