Accreditation Services

Devising a framework for non-profit fundraising

Money is always “top-of-mind” among non-profit leaders, from CEO’s at Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) to Executive Directors at Community-based Organizations. To supplement projects and retain the ability to further their missions, non-profit organizations (NPOs) need funding. When non-profits and funding sources are not well aligned, programs are cut, curtailed, or never launched. Assisting clients in pursuing alternative funding sources requires a creative yet methodical approach to promote success and boost organizational sustainability.

Devising a framework for non-profit funding presents challenges. Funding models/strategies cannot be too general nor too specific. There is not a single approach, a one size fits all model or sourcing strategy for non-profits to pursue. Instead, non-profit leaders must clearly articulate the funding model or strategy that best supports the growth of their organization and use that insight to examine the potential funding opportunities preeminently associated with organization-specific success. For example, a community health center serving patients covered by Medicaid and a non-profit organization doing development work in housing for the homeless are both funded by the federal government, yet the type of funding each receives and the decision makers controlling that funding are very different. Utilizing the same funding methodology for the two would not be productive. Fortunately, there are multiple methods and strategies to acquire funds. Non-profits should be strategic in seeking approaches suitable to their needs and capabilities and be creative in pursuing more than one model to acquire supplemental funds.

The core success of NPOs is based on a range of funding options, private grants and government grants, corporate sponsorships, private funding, endowments, and community fundraising. There is also a considerable amount of money available from the public sector, businesses, charitable trusts, foundations, in-kind donations, and local and state legislative bodies. The goal of any successful fundraising campaign is to convey fully what the money is or will be supporting and clearly articulate the projected positive outcomes that will be derived from the funding. Once the project is fully clarified, the next step is research. Many funding avenues exist. The NPO must decide which funding sources are best suited for each project and pursue those options.

When choosing potential funding sources, NPOs must consider the size of their organization, their mission, and various other defining characteristics. Once this internal due diligence is completed, revenue needs should be clarified, and a tactical fundraising strategy outlined. Creating a “ratio” with the end-result in mind allows for revenue diversification and avoids the too heavy reliance on one income source. For example, an NPO might project obtaining 50% of needed revenues from grants, 20% from a corporate sponsorship, and the remaining 30% from a foundation. Once the funding sources have been identified, the types of decision makers and the motivations of these decision makers must be evaluated. Then, a tactical roadmap designed to obtain the needed funding should be implemented. 

As society looks to the non-profit sector to solve important problems, a realistic understanding of funding models is increasingly important to realizing these aspirations. As consultants whose mission is to turn challenges into triumph for our clients, championing efficacious, high-yielding funding models ensures long-term viability for the organizations we serve.

Success relies on planning. It is much better to be proactive than reactive. Consider your organization’s funding needs, do your research, and lay the groundwork before diving into any fundraising pursuit. An assessment of your organization’s current funding strategies is essential. What is working; what is not? Is the current funding source reflective of the organization’s mission and values? Use the answers to these questions to make decisions and recommendations on which fundraising strategies to source. Get creative! Brainstorm unconventional ways your organization will stand out to potential funders, but be analytical. Balance creativity with data, keeping in mind which funding strategy reflects the best return. Focus time and energy on the funding model that will be most reliable, profitable, and feasible.

The non-profit world rarely engages in a succinct conversation about an organization’s appropriate long-term funding strategy. That is because the different types of funding that fuel non-profits have never been clearly defined. More than a poverty of language, this represents and results in a poverty of understanding and clear thinking. As consultants, HMA can provide an outside perspective and sort through the minutia presenting a clear, methodical, appropriate path to fundraising success.

Potential links to aid in your fundraising endeavors:

https://www.fqhc.org/funding-opportunities
https://www.samhsa.gov/grants
https://www.usgrants.org/business/mental-health-services
https://www.ruralhealthinfo.org/topics/mental-health/funding
https://about.bankofamerica.com/en/making-an-impact/grant-funding-for-nonprofits-sponsorship-programs
https://theathenaforum.org/grants

HMA works with a wide variety of healthcare clients, including FQHCs, community-based organizations, hospitals, provider practices, behavioral health, and managed care organizations, and can help with:

  • Grant Writing
  • Technical Assistance
  • Strategic Planning
  • Financial planning, Implementation and Optimization

For more information about how HMA can help your organization’s grant and funding strategies, contact our experts below.

Learning the invaluable lessons of value-based care at 2023 HMA conference

If you search the term “value-based care” on the internet you will find over 2.5 million hits on that term alone. No one would disagree with the need to provide value to patients and purchasers, but how we define value differs based on where we sit. Value is paying for outcomes, not volume of services. Value is ensuring that patients get the right care at the right time. Value is ensuring that purchasers pay a reasonable cost for the highest possible quality. Value is ensuring that healthcare is provided equitably and sustainably. Implementing value is even trickier than defining it, given the complexity of who pays for care and the challenges of measuring the outcomes we seek to reward.  

From the top office of HHS to the back office of a health center and everywhere in between, HMA leaders have been part of our collective journey to value: advancing policy and regulatory change, calculating risk and setting prices, crafting alternative payment models, integrating social services and behavioral health, and coaching industry leaders to make important changes to their business models to adapt to a more sustainable approach to American healthcare. These experiences – both successes and challenges – provide a unique perspective from which to advise clients on transformation of healthcare.  

The HMA 2023 fall conference, scheduled for October 30-31, 2023, has thoughtfully curated several discussions to educate, enlighten and motivate attendees on industry standards and navigating the practicality of providing value in care, coverage, and patient experience in publicly funded healthcare:  

Leading the Charge on Value, Equity and Growth: The Future of Publicly Sponsored Healthcare: Discuss how these public programs came to be the industry standard bearers and what this shift means for outcomes, affordability, policy, and the overall direction of U.S. healthcare.  

Positive Change and the Growing Importance of Managed Care in Publicly Sponsored Healthcare: Discuss the future of publicly sponsored healthcare, outline promising initiatives aimed at improving coverage and care, and address key concerns over funding, policy, equity, and coordination between government, plans, providers, and members.  

The Future of Delivery Systems: Achieving Operational and Financial Sustainability: Discuss a wide range of practical approaches to prepare for the future, including managing cash flow, optimizing the workforce, developing long-term reimbursement plans, improving operational efficiency, and addressing changes in government policy.   

Real Talk from the Trenches of Value-based Payments: Learn about the advantages and pitfalls of value-based payments, with important insights from organizations that have made it work.  

Navigating Change in Medicare Advantage: A Roadmap for Success: Discuss what Medicare Advantage plans must do to meet the demanding, new requirements – all against a backdrop of continued efforts to improve equity, access, outcomes, and cost.   

In addition, a pre-conference workshop on behavioral health will be held the afternoon of October 29th, prior to the official start of the conference. This workshop will highlight the integral role of behavioral healthcare in improving patient outcomes across the continuum of publicly sponsored healthcare programs.  

We are excited to engage with industry experts throughout these discussions about value-based care and forge a better path forward toward a more sustainable and equitable system of care.  

HMA annual conference on innovations in publicly sponsored healthcare

Innovations in Publicly Sponsored Healthcare: How Medicaid, Medicare, and Marketplaces Are Driving Value, Equity, and Growth

Pre-Conference Workshop: October 29, 2023
Conference: October 30−31, 2023
Location: Fairmont Chicago, Millennium Park

Health Management Associates has announced the preliminary lineup of speakers for its sixth annual conference, Innovations in Publicly Sponsored Healthcare: How Medicaid, Medicare, and Marketplaces Are Driving Value, Equity, and Growth.

Hundreds of executives from health plans, providers, state and federal government, investment firms, and community-based organizations will convene to enjoy top-notch content, make new connections, and garner fresh ideas and best practices.

A pre-conference workshop, Behavioral Health at the Intersection of General Health and Human Services, will take place Sunday, October 29.

Confirmed speakers to date include (in alphabetical order):

  • Jacey Cooper, State Medicaid Director, Chief Deputy Director, California Department of Health Care Services
  • Kelly Cunningham, Administrator, Division of Medical Programs, Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services
  • Karen Dale, Chief Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Officer, AmeriHealth Caritas
  • Mitchell Evans, Market Vice-President, Policy & Strategy, Medicaid & Dual Eligibles, Humana
  • Peter Lee, Health Care Policy Catalyst and former Executive Director, Covered California
  • John Lovelace, President, Government Programs, Individual Advantage, UPMC Health Plan
  • Julie Morita, MD, Executive Vice President, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
  • Anne Rote, President, Medicaid, Health Care Service Corp.
  • Drew Snyder, Executive Director, Mississippi Division of Medicaid
  • Tim Spilker, CEO, UnitedHealthcare Community & State
  • Stacie Weeks, Administrator/Medicaid Director, Division of Health Care Financing and Policy, Nevada Department of Health and Human Services
  • Lisa Wright, President and CEO, Community Health Choice

Publicly sponsored programs like Medicare, Medicaid, and the Marketplaces are leading the charge in driving value, equity, and growth in the U.S. healthcare system. This year’s event will highlight the innovations, initiatives, emerging models, and growth strategies designed to drive improved patient outcomes, increased affordability, and expanded access.

Early bird registration ends July 31. Questions may be directed to Carl Mercurio. Group rates, government discounts, and sponsorships are available.

Register Now

New experts join HMA in April 2023

HMA is pleased to welcome new experts to our family of companies in April 2023.

Jed Abell – Consulting Actuary
Wakely

Jed Abell is a professional health insurance actuary with over 20 years of experience focusing on Medicare Advantage, Part D, and commercial employer group plans.

Surah Alsawaf – Senior Consultant
HMA

Surah Alsawaf is a senior consultant with experience in creating and implementing regulatory strategies and workflows, conducting reviews and audits, and leading cross-functional teams to complete complex deliverables.

Elrycc Berkman – Consulting Actuary
Edrington

Elrycc Berkman is experienced in Medicaid managed care rate development including managed long-term services and supports (MLTSS) and program of all-inclusive care for the elderly (PACE) rate development.

Monica Bonds – Associate Principal
HMA

Monica Bonds is an experienced managed care professional with over 15 years of experience working in large and diverse organizations.

Yucheng Feng – Senior Consulting Actuary
Wakely

Yucheng Feng has over 15 years of experience providing actuarial support for Medicare Advantage clients, including bid preparation, reserve, actuarial analytics and providing strategic recommendations. Read more about Yucheng.

Melanie Hobbs – Associate Principal
HMA

Melanie Hobbs is an accomplished healthcare executive, consultant, and thought leader specializing in Medicare, Medicaid, and Special Needs Plans (SNPs).

Daniel Katzman – Consulting Actuary
Wakely

Daniel Katzman is experienced in Medicare Advantage bid pricing and modeling as well as claims trend analytics and affordability/cost-savings analysis. Read more about Daniel.

Supriya Laknidhi – Principal
HMA

Supriya Laknidhi has over 20 years of experience in the healthcare industry and a proven track record in driving growth and innovation for companies.

Donald Larsen – Principal
HMA

Dr. Donald Larsen is a C-suite physician executive with over 30 years of experience spanning complex academic medical centers, community health systems, acute care hospitals, and research institutes.

Ryan McEntee – Senior Consultant
Wakely

Ryan McEntee is an experienced managed care executive specializing in strategic leadership within Medicare Advantage plans. Read more about Ryan.

Nicole Oishi – Principal
HMA

Nicole Oishi has over 30 years of experience in senior leadership roles as a healthcare clinician and executive.

Read more about our new HMA colleagues

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Surah Alsawaf

Senior Consultant

Elrycc Berkman

Elrycc Berkman

Consulting Actuary II

Monica Bonds

Monica Bonds

Associate Principal

Melanie Hobbs

Associate Principal

Advancing the national dialogue on improving access to quality care

Healthcare executives gathered with HMA leaders in March to learn and share about new initiatives in quality improvement. Panels and discussions were led by esteemed experts, who provided important insight into the multitude of opportunities to improve quality and equity:

From the Experts: CMS has doubled down on its commitment to improve healthcare quality, equity, and access.

The HMA Point of View: Current leadership in Washington has set very clear goals to improve health equity, aligning federal policy as a lever to improve healthcare outcomes. Federal dollars passed along to states are including new rules and objectives to improve quality in an equitable manner. Therefore, those applying for federal contracts and grants must include a strategy to improve quality, equity, affordability, and access.

From the Experts: Interventions need to be robustly evaluated to address equity and social determinants of health (SDOH).

The HMA Point of View: Governments, care providers, and payers have been experimenting with approaches to SDOH, but the bar is now higher and results have to be measurable. New investments that address SDOH and aim to improve equity must include a strategy to measure and analyze results of interventions, including evaluation of critical subpopulations to address disparities. Although experiments will continue, we have reached the point where a robust analysis of outcomes is an expectation.

From the Experts: Quality is playing a central role in operationalizing equity.

The HMA Point of View: While there are many reasons for disparities in health, quality metrics and programs must be designed to improve quality for all patients. Identifying inequities is only the first step; successful programs will advance equity by reducing barriers to care. Measurable quality programs should be designed for population health, but personalized for individuals with clear provider incentives to not only identify disparities but also minimize them. Quality is the tool by which we achieve health equity.

From the Experts: We are on the precipice of doing great things in quality.

The HMA Point of View: Our ability to integrate data from multiple sources is finally getting to a place where patients can get the quality care they need, and providers can give the right care at the right time to improve outcomes. Policymakers have broken down barriers to data sharing, enabling a new economy of information sharing that promises to empower patients and reduce costs. It is no longer enough to have a separate IT or data strategy; anyone working to improve healthcare quality needs to have data strategies within and across every operational function across their organization.

From the Experts: Being rewarded for doing what’s right for the patient is central to continuous quality improvement.

The HMA Point of View: Quality care for the patient means creating the right incentives for payment and care delivery that focus on outcomes and experience. Every point of care in the patient’s health journey needs to be evaluated and designed from the point of view of providing a quality experience. Not every patient has the same journey, and our healthcare system must meet them where they are, delivering for their unique needs. Convenience, personalization, accuracy, simplification, and affordability are nearly as important as clinical outcomes in the mind of most patients and addressing barriers to health can have clinical benefits.

HMA has a long history of working with clients to achieve their quality improvement goals including securing accreditation for both payer and provider organizations, driving clinical practice transformation, and improving the overall value of care. We strongly believe that there is no quality without equity, access, and measurement, and are investing in people and resources to support these needs. Together we are working with clients to advance value-based care, develop programs demonstrating quality, value, and equity in behavioral health, and implement new quality and accreditation programs to better serve their communities.

Learn more about HMA’s continuing work in quality and accreditation and join the conversation on LinkedIn and Twitter using #HMAtalksQuality.

How will changes to Medicare Part C and D Star Ratings impact your plan?

What are your plans to minimize your risk to avoid dropping in your Star Rating or to plan a head to maintain or improve your Star Rating?

On February 1, 2023, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released the 2024 Advance Notice and included some key specifics on the upcoming changes to the Medicare Star Rating program. CMS is proposing changes that will align with the recently announced “Universal Foundation” of quality measures, a core set of measures that are aligned across CMS quality rating and value-based care programs. The Advance Notice also included information on substantive measure specification updates, new measure concepts, and the addition of measures to align with other CMS programs.

You can learn more about these proposed changes along with a blueprint for improving your Medicare Advantage Star Ratings at the HMA quality conference on March 6 in Chicago. The working session “Moving the Needle on Medicare Stars Ratings” will feature speakers Katharine Iskrant, MPH, CHCA, CPHQ, HEDIS/Stars Auditor, President and Owner, Healthy People; John Myers, BS, M.Eng., VP of Health Quality & Stars, Humana; Vanita Pindolia, PharmD, MBA, VP of Stars Program, Emergent Holdings; and Dr. Kate Koplan, MD, MPH, FACP, CPPS, Chief Quality Officer & Associate Medical Director Quality and Safety, Kaiser Permanente of Georgia

Moderators of this session are HMA’s Mary Walter, Managing Director of Quality and Accreditation, and David Wedemeyer, Principal. Both have health plan legacy experience in Stars strategy, execution and getting results.

Objectives of this session:

  1. Overview of the CMS proposed changes and their impact on the Stars program
  2. Attendees will obtain a blueprint for improving Medicare Advantage Star Ratings, including the importance of ensuring executive management buy-in
  3. Discussion of how the use of data analytics can help plans to identify quality gaps, target interventions, and track improvement
  4. Strategies to avoid the type of siloed initiatives that often fail to achieve lasting results
  5. Speakers will also address the importance of quality in achieving market viability and financial
    sustainability

Stay in the know about the upcoming proposed changes and develop your organization’s strategy in this interactive impactful working session. This session will allow attendees to integrate any learnings and take-aways into your Stars program to meet your overall Star Rating strategic goal.

Follow #HMAtalksQuality on Twitter and LinkedIn for more updates on Stars and quality initiative efforts throughout the year. View the full agenda and register for HMA’s first annual quality conference on March 6 in Chicago. Registration closes on February 21, 2023.

What is “adequate” behavioral health provider capacity?

At HMA, our subject matter experts get questions every day from people working in state agencies, counties, health plans and provider groups about how to “right size” the behavioral health continuum to obtain equitable access for growing behavioral health demand. From legislatures to providers, improving access to mental health services is critical to improving overall health outcomes. It is time for behavioral health to create a specific definition of network adequacy that accounts for the complexity and nuance of access to mental health and substance use care. It is time to identify and define the factors that lead to “adequate” provider capacity, to ensure that the right level of care is available to individuals when they need care. Network adequacy in behavioral health needs an overhaul to meet the complexity that is driving access challenges.

Together let’s re-define what “adequate” means in behavioral health to ensure we build systems that meet the needs of communities. At HMA’s quality conference on March 6 in Chicago, the “Developing a Behavioral Health Quality Strategy” working session will engage participants in an in-depth discussion on identifying factors to inform a more accurate definition of behavioral health network adequacy. Speakers will outline some of the core challenges in network adequacy and innovations they have used.  Attendees will work collaboratively in a structured exercise on three knotty challenges within network adequacy to identify factors that could improve measurement for states, plans and providers. The goal is for participants to walk away with tangible actions they can implement in their work on behavioral health access.

Please join HMA’s Serene Olin, Rachel Bembas, and Gina Lasky with our expert panelists:

Nazlim Hagmann, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Commonwealth Care Alliance

Rhonda Robinson Beale, MD, SVP, Chief Medical Officer, Mental Health Services, UnitedHealth Group

Claire Wang, MD, ScD, Associate Deputy Director, Delaware State Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health

And follow #HMAtalksQuality on Twitter and LinkedIn for more updates on behavioral health quality efforts throughout the year. View the full agenda and register for HMA’s first annual quality conference on March 6 in Chicago. Registration closes on February 21, 2023.

CMS creating a ‘Universal Foundation’ to align quality measures

Leaders at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced in the New England Journal of Medicine this month a new initiative called the “Universal Foundation,” which seeks to align quality measures across the more than 20 CMS quality initiatives. The implications for the broader healthcare system are immense. 

At Health Management Associates upcoming quality conference March 6 in Chicago, Dr. Lee Fleisher, one of the authors of the Universal Foundation initiative and, Chief Medical Officer and Director, CMS’ Center for Clinical Standards and Quality, will deliver the keynote address “A Vision for Healthcare Quality: How Policy Can Drive Improved Outcomes.”

Attendees will hear from industry leaders and policy makers about evolving healthcare quality initiatives and participate in substantive workshops where they will learn about and discuss solutions that are using quality frameworks to create a more equitable health system. In addition to Dr. Fleisher, featured speakers will include executives from American College of Surgeons, ANCOR, CareJourney, CareOregon, Commonwealth Care Alliance, Council on Quality and Leadership, Denver Health, Institute on Public Policy for People with Disabilities, Intermountain Health, NCQA, Reema Health, Kaiser Permanente, Social Interventions Research and Evaluation Network, UnitedHealth Group, United Hospital Fund, 3M, and many other organizations.

The Universal Foundation seeks to align quality measures to “focus providers’ attention on measures that are meaningful for the health of broad segments of the population; reduce provider burden by streamlining and aligning measures; advance equity with the use of measures that will help CMS recognize and track disparities in care among and within populations; aid the transition from manual reporting of quality measures to seamless, automatic digital reporting; and permit comparisons among various quality and value-based care programs, to help the agency better understand what drives quality improvement and what does not.”

CMS has established a cross-center working group focused on coordination of these processes and on development and implementation of aligned measures to support a consistent approach. As part of this announcement, the group published a list of Preliminary Adult and Pediatric Universal Foundation Measures. This new quality program will affect clinicians, healthcare settings such as hospitals or skilled nursing facilities, health insurers, and value-based entities such as accountable care organizations.

HMA can help organizations improve their quality efforts in line with the new CMS Universal Foundation initiative. HMA’s more than 500 consultants include past roles as senior officials in Medicaid and Medicare, directors of large nonprofit and social services organizations, top-level advisors, C-level executives at hospitals, health systems and health plans, and senior-level physicians. Our depth of industry-leading policy expertise and clinical experience provides comprehensive solutions that make healthcare and human services work better for people.

To learn more about HMA and Quality, follow #HMAtalksQuality on Twitter and LinkedIn. View the full agenda and register for HMA’s first annual quality conference on March 6 in Chicago. Registration closes on February 21, 2023.

Lee Fleisher of CMS to keynote HMA national quality conference

Join us on Monday, March 6, 2023, at the Fairmont Chicago, Millennium Park, for “Healthcare Quality Conference: A Deep Dive on What’s Next for Providers, Payers, and Policymakers,” where Lee Fleisher, MD, chief medical officer and director of CMS’ Center for Clinical Standards and Quality, will deliver the keynote titled A Vision for Healthcare Quality: How Policy Can Drive Improved Outcomes.

HMA’s first annual quality conference will provide organizations the opportunity to “Focus on Quality to Improve Patients’ Lives.” Attendees will hear from industry leaders and policy makers about evolving health care quality initiatives and participate in substantive workshops where they will learn about and discuss solutions that are using quality frameworks to create a more equitable health system.

In addition to Fleisher, featured speakers will executives from ANCOR, CareOregon, Commonwealth Care Alliance, Council on Quality and Leadership, Intermountain Healthcare, NCQA, Reema Health, Kaiser Permanente, United Hospital Fund, and others.

Working sessions will provide expert-led discussions about how quality is driving federal and state policy, behavioral health integration, approaches to improving equity and measuring the social determinants of health, integration of disability support services, stronger Medicaid core measures, strategies for Medicare Star Ratings, value-based payments, and digital measures and measurement tools. Speakers will provide case studies and innovative approaches to ensuring quality efforts result in lasting improvements in health outcomes.

“What’s different about this conference is that participants will engage in working sessions that provide healthcare executives tools and models for directly impacting quality at their organizations,” said Carl Mercurio, Principal and Publisher, HMA Information Services. 

View the Full Agenda

Early Bird registration ends January 30. Visit the conference website for complete details or contact Carl Mercurio at 212-575-5929/[email protected].  Group rates and sponsorships are available.

Register Now

2022 Yearly Roundup: a year of successful partnerships

The holiday season is grounded in gratitude. At HMA, we are grateful for successful partnerships that have fueled change to improve lives.

We are proud to be trusted advisors to our clients and partners. Their success is our success. In 2022 our clients and partners made significant strides tackling the biggest healthcare challenges, seizing opportunities for growth and innovation, and shaping the healthcare landscape in a way that improves the health and wellness of individuals and communities.

Reforming Colorado’s Behavioral Health System

HMA partnered with the Colorado Department of Human Services to support the planning and implementation of a new Behavioral Health Administration (BHA). HMA provided technical research and extensive stakeholder engagement, drafted models for forming and implementing the BHA, employed an extensive change management approach, and created a detailed implementation plan with ongoing support. Today the BHA is a cabinet member-led agency that collaborates across agencies and sectors to drive a comprehensive and coordinated strategic approach to behavioral health.

From Bid to Trusted Advisor

Wakely Consulting Group, an HMA Company, was engaged to support the launch of a Medicare Advantage (MA) joint venture partnership between a health plan and a provider system. Wakely was responsible for preparing and certifying MA and Medicare Part D (PD) bids, a highly complex, exacting, and iterative effort. The Wakely team quickly became a trusted advisor and go-to resource for the joint venture decision makers. The joint venture has driven significant market growth over its initial years, fueled by a competitive benefit package determined by the client product team.

Laying the Foundation for Modernizing Indiana’s Public Health System

In 2021 Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb appointed a 15-member commission to assess Indiana’s public health system and make recommendations for improvements. The Indiana Department of Health (IDOH) engaged HMA to provide extensive project management and support for six workstreams. HMA prepared a draft report summarizing public input as well as research findings and recommendations. The commission’s final report will form the basis of proposed 2023 legislation, including proposals to substantially increase public health service and funding across the state.

Multiple Clients Accepted into ACO REACH Model

In early 2022 HMA and Wakely Consulting Group, an HMA Company, assisted multiple clients with their applications to participate in the new CMS ACO REACH model. The purpose of this model is to improve quality of care for Medicare beneficiaries through better care coordination and increased engagement between providers and patients including those who are underserved. The team tailored their support depending on each client’s needs. The application selection process was highly competitive. Of the 271 applications received, CMS accepted just under 50 percent. Notably, nine out of the 10 organizations HMA and Wakely supported were accepted into the model.

Pipeline Research and Policy Recommendations to Address New Innovative Therapies

HMA, and subsidiaries The Moran Company and Leavitt Partners, were selected by a large pharmaceutical manufacturer to analyze the current pipeline of innovative therapies, examine reimbursement policies to assess long-term compatibility with the adoption of innovative therapies and novel delivery mechanisms, and make policy recommendations to address any challenges identified through the process. The project equipped the client with a holistic understanding of future potential impacts and actions to address challenges in a detailed pipeline analysis of innovative therapies.