Opioid Crisis Response

Minnesota’s initiative to build a stronger substance use disorder ecosystem

This week, our In Focus section spotlights Minnesota’s innovative efforts to develop a comprehensive ecosystem that addresses substance use disorder (SUD).  

Overview  

Like many states, Minnesota experienced a significant surge in overdose deaths between 2018 and 2021, magnifying disparities in health outcomes linked to SUD and fatalities. For example, in 2021, Native American Minnesotans were 10 times more likely to succumb to a drug overdose than their white counterparts. Similarly, Black Minnesotans faced over three times the risk of dying from a drug overdose compared with White Minnesotans.

How do you create a more effective SUD prevention and treatment system? By fostering collaboration among the people who are directly affected, service providers, advocates, policymakers, and payors so they can learn from one another, offer support, and collectively commit to advancing change. 

The Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS) Behavioral Health Division has enlisted Health Management Associates, Inc. (HMA), to facilitate the Minnesota SUD Community of Practice (CoP), with the goal of creating a culturally responsive system of care. A CoP has three primary elements: 

  • A common identity, purpose, or value that encourages engagement and mutual exploration 
  • A community that establishes a culture of learning and willingness to share, ask, and listen 
  • The cultivation of practices where the community develops, shares, and maintains frameworks, tools, and ideas that are evidence-based and usedii 

HMA understands that a well-established CoP, supported by solid processes, tools, resources, and expertise, is essential to realize and sustain a strong CoP foundation for translating knowledge into action. 

Many states, including Minnesota, are using the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) criteria as the guidepost of their efforts to improve the addiction treatment system. To develop a road map on how to implement the ASAM Fourth Edition Levels of Care in Minnesota, HMA convened workgroups to collect firsthand information about services available in participants’ communities, whether they can deliver services at the ASAM level, and the barriers to providing this level of care.  

The Approach  

To authentically engage the community, HMA has partnered with three community advisors, each representing communities with the most significant disparities. The community advisors are integral to ensuring all CoP efforts incorporate a cultural lens that is responsive to the needs of communities facing health inequities. They do so by amplifying the voices and experiences of individuals in populations disproportionately affected by SUDs. In addition, the community advisors provide tailored facilitation, training, and resources within their respective CoPs to promote culturally specific and responsive practices. This approach seeks to increase treatment engagement and reduce disparities in treatment outcomes. 

HMA is working with the CoP to create a report on SUD treatment gaps, a strategic planning and implementation summary, an ASAM implementation road map, a community advocacy capacity-building report, and an overview of culturally specific and responsive models of care.  

Connect with Us  

HMA brings experience in helping to build systems of care and expertise in assisting states with assessing ASAM levels of care and developing strategies, plans, and training to bolster these efforts. HMA is committed to empowering individuals with lived experience and people underserved by existing systems to play key roles in shaping new systems aimed at fostering equitable care. 

The May 2024 edition of HMA’s Podcast, Vital Viewpoints, features a discussion with HMA Principal Debbi Witham about her insights on the ASAM levels and the impact on systems of care.  She shares her in-depth understanding of the complexities of SUD and underscores the crucial need for quality measures and sustainable healthcare funding while warning against investing in ineffective systems. Ms. Witham further emphasizes how states might correct course now to ensure equitable distribution of funding and offers insights into the essential steps for coordinating a community response that enhances outcomes.  

For more information about HMA’s work in Minnesota and similar projects in other states contact Paul Fleissner, Boyd Brown, and Debbi Witham.  

SAMHSA’s next chapter: priorities, programs, and possibilities

The prospect of new leadership due to a presidential election brings with it the potential for significant shifts in priorities, policies, and programs within federal agencies. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) plays an increasingly critical role in shaping the nation’s mental health and substance use disorder services in the United States. Mental health and the opioid crisis are a salient political issue that will receive some attention on the campaign trail, but candidates are unlikely to detail the specifics on how the rhetoric becomes reality.

SAMHSA’s budget could see adjustments, channeling resources toward initiatives that align with the new administration’s vision. This could mean increased funding for specific programs deemed critical under the new leadership and decreases for other programs. Any major shifts in funding will require the support of Congress. Also possible with new leadership are changes to programmatic approaches that revolve around the introduction of novel interventions, expansion of access to treatments, and addressing emerging challenges such as the opioid crisis with renewed vigor.

The intersection of technology and mental health is likely to receive heightened attention. Telehealth expansions, digital tools for prevention and intervention, and data-driven innovations may become focal points of SAMHSA’s strategy.

As SAMHSA adapts to new leadership, the opportunity arises to forge innovative pathways toward improved mental health outcomes and enhanced support for individuals and communities affected by substance use disorders. By embracing whatever change may come, SAMHSA can continue its vital mission of promoting behavioral health and resilience across the nation. The results of the 2024 election will have a significant impact on federal mental health policy in the coming years; DC Direct subscribers get a steady stream of insight to stay on top of what’s coming next.

Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Ecosystem of Care Webinar Series: Pivoting to Save Lives

Over the coming weeks, HMA is presenting a 3-part webinar series describing a whole person, integrated, solutions-based approach to the ongoing overdose epidemic. It is time to reconsider standard attempts to solve this crisis. Leaders need to be willing to pivot away from approaches that have not yielded the level of impact that this crisis demands, and to be ready to try new ideas and solutions.

“An ideal Ecosystem of Care is person-centered, and parts of the system work together to eliminate stigma, overcome barriers, and prevent people from falling through the cracks that are currently pervasive,” says Dr. Jean Glossa, Managing Director. “Stakeholders participating in SUD care, prevention, and treatment may need to expand their services and work together with other partners in ways they have not before.” 

Each webinar in this series will share HMA’s nuanced understanding of the many paths available for those seeking recovery or a different relationship to addictive behaviors. Experts in the field will share valuable insights, shedding light on the various interventions and strategies that contribute to a holistic and effective approach to supporting individuals on their journey to lasting recovery. Whether you are a healthcare professional, caregiver, or someone personally affected by substance use, this webinar offers a roadmap for navigating the complexities of the Substance Use Care Continuum, fostering hope and resilience in the pursuit of sustained well-being.

By attending this series of webinars, you will learn how to:

  • Describe ongoing overdose crisis as a national public health emergency.
  • Recognize where certain solutions didn’t create the desired impact.
  • Consider new approaches and solutions to overcome ingrained stigma.

Part 1: Overview and The Role of Health Promotion and Harm Reduction Strategies
Part 2: Empowering Change in the SUD Ecosystem
Part 3: Building Systems-Thinking in the SUD Ecosystem

HMA expert consultants have deep expertise, and professional on-the-ground lived experience, with supporting efforts nationwide to build an evidence-based, patient-centered, and sustainable addiction treatment ecosystem. No matter the scope or size of the project, HMA has experience working with states, and community organizations to develop impactful, sustainable responses to SUD. Our team is ready to help clients create, disseminate, and implement actionable and sustainable programs, to address substance use, overdose, and addiction.

Check out these related resources:

If you have other questions or want to speak to someone about how HMA can help your organization with some of these ideas, please contact Jean Glossa or Erin Russell.

HMA presented at 2024 Opioid & Fentanyl Abuse Management Forum in New Orleans

HMA Principal Teresa Garate, PhD presents at the 2024 Opioid & Fentanyl Abuse Management Forum sponsored by the World Conference Forum. She is standing at the front of a room next to a screen.

On February 15, 2024, HMA Principals Teresa Garate, PhD and Anika Alvanzo, MD, MS presented at the 2024 Opioid & Fentanyl Abuse Management Forum sponsored by the World Conference Forum. Their presentation focused on enhancing outreach strategies for reaching and engaging people suffering from opioid use disorder in their communities. Participants were able to learn about public health approaches, harm reduction and low-barrier treatment, as well as an understanding of the considerations needed when building community driven strategies that are person-centered.

Dr. Garate also served as chairperson for the two-day event, providing opening remarks on the first day, engaged panelists in provocative conversations, and closed out the gathering with a summary of the presentations. With a deep understanding that addiction is a disease of the brain, the presentations focused on biopsychosocial approaches and highlighted the use of multiple and diverse interventions. The compilation of the event’s presentations resulted in robust discussions on research, model programs, model strategies, and the critical role of policy, funding, innovation, and data sharing. The overarching message was that as a collective group of advocates, we must continue to use every resource we have at our disposal to push the envelope and challenge the status quo so that we can stop the increase in overdoses and overdose deaths.

At HMA, consultants on our opioid team have unique expertise and more than 30 years of experience tackling every part of the substance use disorder system. They have led the development of comprehensive prevention, evidence-based treatment, and recovery solutions at the state, county and community level.  We have experience working with states and community organizations to develop impactful, sustainable responses to opioid crisis issues. Our team is ready to help clients create actionable and sustainable programs to address the opioid epidemic and addiction treatment.

Contact us to learn more about how we can help your organization develop programs to help combat the opioid crisis.

To treat residents with OUD, nursing facilities must improve practices and reduce stigma

This week, our In Focus section highlights a Health Affairs Forefront post, “To Treat Residents With OUD, Nursing Facilities Must Improve Practices and Reduce Stigma,” published June 8, 2023. Health Management Associates (HMA) consultants Dina Besirevic, Kamala Greene Genece, Debbi Witham, David F. Polakoff, and Barry J. Jacobs wrote the article.

The HMA colleagues note that two recent healthcare industry trends are converging to change the admission criteria and clinical practices that some skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) use. Driving one movement is the opioid epidemic in which increased prevalence of fentanyl and its medical complications are spurring the need for posthospital discharge SNF admissions. The other stems from the low occupancy rates in many SNFs since the pandemic. As a result, more SNFs are considering filling beds by admitting individuals with opioid use disorder (OUD) for the first time.

In many respects, this a positive development. The need for skilled nursing care, such as medication-assisted treatment (MAT), for individuals with OUD has never been greater. A March 23, 2023, US Drug Enforcement Administration public safety alert reported that recently analyzed fentanyl samples in 48 of the 50 states had been adulterated with xylazine, or “tranq,” a veterinary sedative added to prolong an opioid high. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), extensive xylazine use commonly causes severe skin wounds requiring weeks of intravenous antibiotics and skilled wound care to prevent amputations. Providing well-managed post-acute care for these patients could lead to improved outcomes.

But admitting and treating individuals with OUD now poses multiple challenges for SNF staffs and administrators. Many of these healthcare workers lack training in OUD pharmacological and support care. Some have stigmatizing attitudes toward individuals with OUD. To address these concerns, SNFs across the country have developed different practice models. Examples include:

  • Laguna Honda in San Francisco trains its staff to understand OUD, recognize the signs of resident opioid use, and work closely with nearby OUD providers to provide all OUD treatment.
  • At Highbridge Woodycrest Center in the Bronx, NY, the storage and administration of MAT is managed by the SNF staff through a collaborative relationship with a community-based provider, Bronx Care Health System, which prescribes the medications and then delivers them to the facility.
  • At other SNFs, SNF physicians and nurse practitioners prescribe buprenorphine with consultation as needed from community-based OUD providers.

HMA’s experts in OUD and SNFs are working collaboratively to assist SNFs interested in exploring the clinical, financial, and operational opportunities and challenges with this emerging line of business. For questions or inquiries, please contact Barry J. Jacobs.

Link to Health Affairs post.

HMA annual conference on innovations in publicly sponsored healthcare

Innovations in Publicly Sponsored Healthcare: How Medicaid, Medicare, and Marketplaces Are Driving Value, Equity, and Growth

Pre-Conference Workshop: October 29, 2023
Conference: October 30−31, 2023
Location: Fairmont Chicago, Millennium Park

Health Management Associates has announced the preliminary lineup of speakers for its sixth annual conference, Innovations in Publicly Sponsored Healthcare: How Medicaid, Medicare, and Marketplaces Are Driving Value, Equity, and Growth.

Hundreds of executives from health plans, providers, state and federal government, investment firms, and community-based organizations will convene to enjoy top-notch content, make new connections, and garner fresh ideas and best practices.

A pre-conference workshop, Behavioral Health at the Intersection of General Health and Human Services, will take place Sunday, October 29.

Confirmed speakers to date include (in alphabetical order):

  • Jacey Cooper, State Medicaid Director, Chief Deputy Director, California Department of Health Care Services
  • Kelly Cunningham, Administrator, Division of Medical Programs, Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services
  • Karen Dale, Chief Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Officer, AmeriHealth Caritas
  • Mitchell Evans, Market Vice-President, Policy & Strategy, Medicaid & Dual Eligibles, Humana
  • Peter Lee, Health Care Policy Catalyst and former Executive Director, Covered California
  • John Lovelace, President, Government Programs, Individual Advantage, UPMC Health Plan
  • Julie Morita, MD, Executive Vice President, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
  • Anne Rote, President, Medicaid, Health Care Service Corp.
  • Drew Snyder, Executive Director, Mississippi Division of Medicaid
  • Tim Spilker, CEO, UnitedHealthcare Community & State
  • Stacie Weeks, Administrator/Medicaid Director, Division of Health Care Financing and Policy, Nevada Department of Health and Human Services
  • Lisa Wright, President and CEO, Community Health Choice

Publicly sponsored programs like Medicare, Medicaid, and the Marketplaces are leading the charge in driving value, equity, and growth in the U.S. healthcare system. This year’s event will highlight the innovations, initiatives, emerging models, and growth strategies designed to drive improved patient outcomes, increased affordability, and expanded access.

Early bird registration ends July 31. Questions may be directed to Carl Mercurio. Group rates, government discounts, and sponsorships are available.

Register Now

New experts join HMA in April 2023

HMA is pleased to welcome new experts to our family of companies in April 2023.

Jed Abell – Consulting Actuary
Wakely

Jed Abell is a professional health insurance actuary with over 20 years of experience focusing on Medicare Advantage, Part D, and commercial employer group plans.

Surah Alsawaf – Senior Consultant
HMA

Surah Alsawaf is a senior consultant with experience in creating and implementing regulatory strategies and workflows, conducting reviews and audits, and leading cross-functional teams to complete complex deliverables.

Elrycc Berkman – Consulting Actuary
Edrington

Elrycc Berkman is experienced in Medicaid managed care rate development including managed long-term services and supports (MLTSS) and program of all-inclusive care for the elderly (PACE) rate development.

Monica Bonds – Associate Principal
HMA

Monica Bonds is an experienced managed care professional with over 15 years of experience working in large and diverse organizations.

Yucheng Feng – Senior Consulting Actuary
Wakely

Yucheng Feng has over 15 years of experience providing actuarial support for Medicare Advantage clients, including bid preparation, reserve, actuarial analytics and providing strategic recommendations. Read more about Yucheng.

Melanie Hobbs – Associate Principal
HMA

Melanie Hobbs is an accomplished healthcare executive, consultant, and thought leader specializing in Medicare, Medicaid, and Special Needs Plans (SNPs).

Daniel Katzman – Consulting Actuary
Wakely

Daniel Katzman is experienced in Medicare Advantage bid pricing and modeling as well as claims trend analytics and affordability/cost-savings analysis. Read more about Daniel.

Supriya Laknidhi – Principal
HMA

Supriya Laknidhi has over 20 years of experience in the healthcare industry and a proven track record in driving growth and innovation for companies.

Donald Larsen – Principal
HMA

Dr. Donald Larsen is a C-suite physician executive with over 30 years of experience spanning complex academic medical centers, community health systems, acute care hospitals, and research institutes.

Ryan McEntee – Senior Consultant
Wakely

Ryan McEntee is an experienced managed care executive specializing in strategic leadership within Medicare Advantage plans. Read more about Ryan.

Nicole Oishi – Principal
HMA

Nicole Oishi has over 30 years of experience in senior leadership roles as a healthcare clinician and executive.

Read more about our new HMA colleagues

Default no photo

Surah Alsawaf

Senior Consultant

Elrycc Berkman

Elrycc Berkman

Consulting Actuary II

Monica Bonds

Monica Bonds

Associate Principal

Melanie Hobbs

Associate Principal

Mental health and addiction crises top the federal policy agenda in 2023

This week our In Focus section reviews President Joseph R. Biden’s 2023 State of the Union Address (SOTU) to Congress. The President highlighted specific actions that Congress, and the Administration have taken over the last two years to advance his health care priorities.

During his first SOTU address in 2022, President Biden announced the creation of a “Unity Agenda”, which included priority policy areas with potential for bi-partisan support. The President highlighted several steps the Administration has taken to advance the “Unity Agenda” including:

  • The bipartisan effort to enact the Mainstreaming Addiction Treatment (MAT) Act, which removed the federal requirement for practitioners to have a waiver (known as the X-waiver) to prescribe medications, like buprenorphine, for the treatment of opioid use disorder
  • The Cancer Moonshot announcements for almost 30 new programs, policies, and resources to close the screening gap, tackle environmental exposure, decrease preventable cancers, advance cutting-edge research, support patients and caregivers, and more.
  • Addressing mental health needs through the expansion of Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics and launch of the 988-suicide prevention hotline.

In his SOTU and accompanying White House materials, the President also proposed new policies and initiatives to further advance his health care agenda. These actions include a combination of issues that would require Congressional approval as well as actions regulatory agencies can already advance. Congress and the Administration are expected to build on previous bipartisan achievements to tackle the nation’s dual crises with addiction and mental health.

Notably, the policies outlined in the SOTU foreshadow an active regulatory agenda over the next 18 months as the Administration seeks to solidify key aspects of the President’s health care agenda ahead of the next Presidential election.

The Administration’s planned actions include the following:

Opioids

  • Calling on Congress to pass legislation to permanently schedule all illicitly produced fentanyl-related substances into Schedule I.
  • SAMHSA will provide enhanced technical assistance to states who have existing State Opioid Response funds, and will host peer learning forums, national policy academies, and convenings with organizations distributing naloxone beginning this spring.
  • By this summer, the Federal Bureau of Prisons will ensure that each of their 122 facilities are equipped and trained to provide in-house medication-assisted treatment (MAT).
  • This spring CMS will provide guidance to states on the use of federal Medicaid funding to provide health care services—including treatment for people with substance use disorder—to individuals in state and local jails and prisons prior to their release. California is the first state to receive approval for a similar initiative.

Mental Health

  • CDC plans to launch a new campaign to provide a hub of mental health and resiliency resources to health care organizations in better supporting their workforce.
  • The Department of Education (ED) will announce more than $280 million in grants to increase the number of mental health care professionals in high-need districts and strengthen the school-based mental health profession pipeline.
  • HHS and ED will issue guidance and propose a rule to make it easier for schools to provide health care to students and more easily bill Medicaid for these services.
  • The Administration is scheduled to propose new mental health parity rules this spring.
  • HHS will improve the capacity of the 988 Lifeline by investing in an expansion of the crisis care workforce; scaling mobile crisis intervention services; and developing additional guidance on best practices in crisis response.
  • HHS also plans to promote interstate license reciprocity for delivery of mental health services across state lines.
  • HHS intends to increase funding to recruit future mental health professionals from Historically Black Colleges and Universities and to expand the Minority Fellowship Program.
  • The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), working with HHS and Defense, will launch a program for states, territories, Tribes and Tribal organizations to develop and implement proposals to reduce suicides in the military and among veterans.
  • VA will also increase the number of peer specialists working across VA medical centers to meet mental health needs

Cancer Moonshot

  • The President called on Congress to reauthorize the National Cancer Act to overhaul cancer research and to extend the funding for biomedical research established in the 21st Century Cures Act.
  • The Administration will take steps to ensure that patient navigation services are covered by insurance. This could require legislation depending on which type on insurance an individual has.

Health care costs

  • Urging Congress to pass legislation to cap insulin prices in all health care markets. Expanding the $35 insulin cap to commercial markets will require the 60 votes in the Senate.

Home and community services

  • Working with Congress to approve legislation to ensure seniors and people with disabilities can access home care services and to provide support to caregivers.

HMA and HMA companies are closely monitoring these federal policy developments. We can assist healthcare stakeholders in responding to the immediate opportunities and challenges that arise and contextualize these actions for longer-term strategic business and operational decisions.

If you have questions about these or other federal policy issues and how they will impact your organization please contact Andrea Maresca ([email protected]) or Liz Wroe ([email protected]).

Delaware substance use disorder treatment system needs assessment

This week, our In Focus highlights a Health Management Associates Institute on Addiction (HMA IOA) report, Delaware Substance Use Disorder Treatment System Needs Assessment, published in June 2022. HMA IOA conducted a statewide three-county substance use disorder (SUD) treatment system needs assessment in Delaware. This project began in November 2021 and was primarily funded by New Castle County with contributions from Kent and Sussex counties. The goal was to review the current state of the SUD treatment ecosystem, identify strengths and gaps collecting input from as many Delawareans across multiple sectors as possible, and make actionable recommendations to build a more robust and sustainable future state system.

The final analysis included interviews with key stakeholders, focus groups, a survey of all licensed SUD providers, claims data analysis, and a comparison of Delaware’s public (e.g., Medicaid) outpatient and residential SUD reimbursement rates with selected regional states. This approach provided a unique cross-sector view of where the most significant opportunities for improvement and investment may rest.

The areas of greatest experienced need in the system were reported as: inadequate treatment beds, especially for some populations, like children and youth; lack of residential services for adults, especially those on Medicare and without insurance; needed supports for those experiencing negative impacts from social determinants of health (SDOH), like transportation and housing needs; lack of consistent access and care coordination; lack of adequate reimbursement to sustain the system or expand the treatment system; the need for trauma-informed care (TIC); and the need for more harm reduction and prevention strategies, including greater access specifically to Narcan 4mg Nasal Spray or its generic equivalent.

The study found that Delaware is meeting only 15 percent of SUD treatment needs and only meeting five percent of the need for the highest-intensity services, including inpatient treatment.

The results also showed an apparent discrepancy between what the state is working hard to implement to address the SUD and overdose crisis in Delaware and the community’s perception of, or lived experience with, those SUD treatment services and supports. Additionally, HMA IOA heard about many treatment system strengths from interviewees, town hall participants, and focus groups and included recommendations that are meant to leverage those existing strengths in the future treatment system.

Click here to read the report.

Early bird registration discount expires July 11 for HMA conference on the future of publicly sponsored healthcare, October 10-11 in Chicago

Be sure to register for HMA’s 2022 Conference by Monday, July 11, to get the special early bird rate of $1,695 per person. After July 11, the rate is $1,895.

Nearly 40 industry speakers, including health plan executives, state Medicaid directors, and providers, are confirmed for HMA’s The New Normal: How Medicaid, Medicare, and Other Publicly Sponsored Programs Are Shaping the Future of Healthcare in a Time of Crisis conference, October 10-11, at the Fairmont Chicago, Millennium Park.

In addition to keynote sessions featuring some of the nation’s top Medicaid and Medicaid executives, attendees can choose from multiple breakout and plenary sessions on behavioral health, dual eligibles, healthcare investing, technology-enabled integrated care, social determinants of health, eligibility redeterminations, staffing, senior care, and more.

There will also be a Pre-Conference Workshop on The Future of Payment Reform: Delivering Value, Managing Risk in Medicare and Medicaid, on Sunday, October 9.

Visit our website for complete details: https://conference.healthmanagement.com/ or contact Carl Mercurio. Group rates and sponsorships are available. The last HMA conference attracted 500 attendees.

State Medicaid Speakers to Date (In alphabetical order)

  • Cristen Bates, Interim Medicaid Director, CO Department of Healthcare Policy & Financing
  • Jacey Cooper, Medicaid Director, Chief Deputy Director, California Department of Health Care Services
  • Kody Kinsley, Secretary, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services
  • Allison Matters Taylor, Medicaid Director, Indiana
  • Dave Richard, Deputy Secretary, North Carolina Medicaid
  • Debra Sanchez-Torres, Senior Advisor, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Jami Snyder, Director, Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System
  • Amanda Van Vleet, Associate Director, Innovation, NC Medicaid Strategy Office, North Carolina Department of Health & Human Services

Medicaid Managed Care Speakers to Date (In alphabetical order)

  • John Barger, National VP, Dual Eligible and Medicaid Programs, Humana, Inc.
  • Michael Brodsky, MD, Medical Director, Behavioral Health and Social Services, L.A. Care Health Plan
  • Aimee Dailey, President, Medicaid, Anthem, Inc.
  • Rebecca Engelman, EVP, Medicaid Markets, AmeriHealth Caritas
  • Brent Layton, President, COO, Centene Corporation
  • Andrew Martin, National Director of Business Development (Housing+Health), UnitedHealth Group
  • Kelly Munson, President, Aetna Medicaid
  • Thomas Rim, VP, Product Development, AmeriHealth Caritas
  • Timothy Spilker, CEO, UnitedHealthcare Community & State
  • Courtnay Thompson, Market President, Select Health of SC, an AmeriHealth Caritas Company
  • Ghita Worcester, SVP, Public Affairs & Chief Marketing Officer, UCare
  • Mary Zavala, Director, Enhanced Care Management, L.A. Care Health Plan

Provider Speakers to Date (In alphabetical order)

  • Daniel Elliott, MD, Medical Director, Christiana Care Quality Partners, eBrightHealth ACO, ChristianaCare Health System
  • Taylor Nichols, Director of Social Services, Los Angeles Christian Health Centers
  • Abby Riddle, President, Florida Complete Care; SVP, Medicare Operations, Independent Living Systems
  • David Rogers, President, Independent Living Systems
  • Mark Sasvary, Chief Clinical Officer, CBHS, IPA, LLC
  • Jim Sinkoff, Deputy Executive Officer, CFO, SunRiver Health
  • Tim Skeen, Senior Corporate VP, CIO, Sentara Healthcare
  • Efrain Talamantes, SVP & COO, Health Services, AltaMed Health Services Corporation

Featured Speakers to Date (In alphabetical order)

  • Drew Altman, President and CEO, Kaiser Family Foundation
  • Cindy Cota, Director of Managed Medicaid Growth and Innovation, Volunteers of America
  • Jesse Hunter, Operating Partner, Welsh, Carson, Anderson & Stowe
  • Bryant Hutson, VP, Business Development, MedArrive
  • Martin Lupinetti, President, CEO, HealthShare Exchange (HSX)
  • Todd Rogow, President, CEO, Healthix
  • Joshua Traylor, Senior Director, Health Care Transformation Task Force
  • James Whittenburg, CEO, TenderHeart Health Outcomes
  • Shannon Wilson, VP, Population Health & Health Equity, Priority Health; Executive Director, Total Health Care Foundation